Author Topic: Turbine engines?  (Read 4848 times)

stewardc

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Turbine engines?
« on: December 07, 2004, 09:26:31 AM »
Some time ago, American LaFrance built a turbine engined ladder truck. Does anyone know if there were any others which built this type of truck? Pictures can be emailed to me, please!

John Hanson

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Turbine engines?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2005, 07:36:02 PM »
Kenworth experimented with turbines in the 40's... but they weren't practical then.
John

John Hanson

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Turbine engines?
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2005, 07:36:30 PM »
Kenworth experimented with turbines in the 40's... but they weren't practical then.
John

MAGMAN

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Turbine engines?
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2005, 01:57:27 PM »
Back in 1978 I took a peek at what was happening with gas turbine engines in heavy trucks and was surprised to learn that most North American manufacturers were running at least one line-haul test bed unit. Ford had their  futuristically-styled "Big Red" doubles outfit powered by the 600-hp Ford 705-series GT engine running coast to coast as long ago as 1964 and later, in 1966, used a W-1000 tractor unit to test the low pressure 707 GT. But by the late 1970s, the lack of any real progress meant that Ford's GT engine project had already been relegated to back burner status.
The "Turbo Titan" was one of several GM test bed units and this was operational from around 1968. Power was a modest 280-hp and GM claimed that this was a highly developed version of earlier prototype models. The GT-309 GT drove through a six speed automatic transmission. Another GM gas turbine engine, the GT-404, was installed in a White/Freightliner cabover with distinctive exhaust stacks measuring 10-inches in diameter.
The Cummins Engine Company entered a joint venture with German truck builder MAN, but this was subsequently abandoned with little progress having been made. Similarly Mack Trucks were working with German engine manufacturer KHD and this venture - known as ITI - never witnessed the on-road trialling of any gas turbine engines in North America as far as I know. However, the Orenda Division of Hawker Siddeley was testing the OT4 600-hp regenerator in a cabover White model 7000 tractor while International and Kenworth were operating their own parts delivery tractors, using them as test beds for their own gas turbine engines.
Despite the advantages of low weight and the ability to run on a variety of different fuels, the gas turbine engine was plagued with reliabilty and heat dissipation problems (the turbines spun at something like 40,000-RPM!) and not one example ever entered production.

Rob Archer

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Future of Turbines?
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2005, 05:48:53 PM »
Will they be brought back; do you think; Magman?
The diesel engine won't be the only propulsion device in the enar future.
It is only 2 years off from the next wave of cleaner engines. They are getting less reliable with every clean up requirement.

I'm not an engineer (massive understatement) but will we see hybrids like the Toyota Prius?
Diesel electrics like in a railway (railROAD for Steve) locomotive?
Is a turbine getting closer?

MAGMAN

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Turbine engines?
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2005, 02:21:26 PM »
Rob, it doesn't look as though the turbine has a future as a power plant for heavy trucks. Most guys I talk to among the European manufacturers anyway seem to believe that we will go on refining and re-refining the diesel engine until someone comes up with a viable and commercially acceptable alternative to diesel fuel. I regret never having seen or heard a gas turbine-engine truck actually working but I guess they were always pretty thin on the ground. Still, no complaints really. I have driven a whole bunch of different makes and models over the past 40-years and that in itself is a privilege not everyone gets to enjoy.

Astro

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Turbine engines?
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2005, 10:59:55 AM »
Curiously,everybody's talking about the new age of motorisation being base on the fuel cell,which seems to be on its way in cars but...nobody talk about what will be in trucks(one can conclude,it will just be the same,but bigger)but worst,what will power those damn...planes???

RodeoJoe

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2006, 12:27:50 AM »
I had a friend, now since passed on, that drove a cabover KW for LASME (Los Angeles Seattle Motor Express) that was powered by a Boeing turbine.  Wally said the thing pulled like jack the bear but they couldn't keep fuel in it.  LASME ran single axle joints with the lead trailer for fuel and the back box for freight.

W. Lineman

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2006, 08:57:47 PM »
The turbine engine has problems with fuel economy and thin air.

What I remember about the turbine powered truck experiments in the 70's is that you couldn't talk in miles per gallon.
You had to talk in gallons per mile.

Andy Granatelli ran a turbine engine at Indy for STP. They were praying for a cold raceday. If it was 60 degrees they would have 600 hp. If it was 70 degrees they would have 540 hp. If it was 80 degrees they would have only 480 hp. Something like that.

-Bill


Jim Herriot

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2006, 03:39:01 PM »
Ford had their ?futuristically-styled "Big Red" doubles outfit powered by the 600-hp Ford 705-series GT engine running coast to coast as long ago as 1964 and later, in 1966, used a W-1000 tractor unit to test the low pressure 707 GT.



? ? ? ? ? ? ?This looks like the "W" model, gasser................ Jim.


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Gary Smith

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2006, 11:03:16 PM »
The Mack Museum has a gas turbine powered Cruise-Liner on display.  I believe that the engine might be a Garrett, since Mack and Garrett were under common ownership (Signal Companies) at the time.
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Alan Drake

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2006, 03:14:02 AM »
In the UK  Leyland developed a gas turbine engined truck in the early 70's. I think probably as many as 5 made it into trial testing with transport companies. The truck was based on Leylands Ergonomic cab of the time. I think the project was abandoned possibly around 1974. I am almost certain that one survives at the British Commercial Motor Museum in Leyland UK

EvanMcCausland

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2006, 06:06:22 PM »
The "Turbo Titan" was one of several GM test bed units and this was operational from around 1968. Power was a modest 280-hp and GM claimed that this was a highly developed version of earlier prototype models. The GT-309 GT drove through a six speed automatic transmission.

That was the Chevrolet Turbo Titan III, which came out in late 1964.

Previously, Chevy had the Turbo Titan I of 1956, and the Turbo Titan II of 1959.  These were built in stock Chevy heavy duty conventionals, and were equipped with the GT-304 and GT-305, respectively.

1965 saw the GM Bison concept, which was powered by the GT-309, much like the TT III.

In 1969, a GT 309 was installed in a GMC Astro 95, and a similar experiment was repeated in 1979, but with a GT-404.

GM was also active in putting gas turbines in experimental buses.  1954's TurboCruiser I sported a GT-300, and 1964's TurboCruiser II was equipped with a GT 309.  This coach was improved and re-built as the TurboCruiser III in 1969, albeit I think it still used the GT-309 at that time.  I've not been able to confirm or deny that at this time.

The GT 309 was also used in the experimental GMC R(apid) T(ransit) (e)X(perimental) of 1968, coupled through a prototype Allison Toric transmission.  This bus was the predecessor to the 1973 Transbus submission, which too was turbine powered - albeit with a GT-404.

In '71, the GT-404 was installed in a few MCI MC-7 coaches owned by Greyhound, and named "Super Turbocruisers".  In '79, Baltimore operated one RTS-II 03 coach equipped with a GT-404, while the remainder of their order was powered by conventional Detroit Diesel power.

charlie

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2006, 01:55:16 PM »
The Mack Museum has a gas turbine powered Cruise-Liner on display. 

That's the one i climbed into when i went there last month. Awesome truck & my tour guide told me all about it. Very interesting.

livewire64

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Re: Turbine engines?
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2007, 02:03:50 PM »
Has anyone got any pics of the Turbine that was used in the Astro 95 ?