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Author Topic: Western New York Truckstops  (Read 12962 times)

Rob Archer

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Western New York Truckstops
« on: December 06, 2004, 05:41:15 PM »
I wonder if any of these are still around or what is there now

Rochester: There was a big ( well to me in the 1970's) Truckstops Of America truck stop in Rochester (Henrietta) NY. I don't think it's there today. What is in Rochester now?

near Batavia: Texaco Town. This place was a small diner with a Texaco station that sold diesel. It was full of steel haulers who ran US 20 to avoid the New York Thruway tolls.

Wayland : Betty's Diner was a classic diner made from a railroad car. There was a large (muddy) parking lot for trucks.

Dansville There was a Truckstops? truck stop open when the interstate highway to Rochester was put through.

Niagara Falls There was a truckstop on US 62 between Buffalo and Niagara Falls. I can't recall the name but think it might have been called Junior's

Buffalo I never did find SAM's Truckstop. I usually crossed the border at Niagara Falls.

Cuba There was a truckstop near Cuba on NY 17 - The Quikway

Are any of these still open today?

Hank's Truck Forum

Western New York Truckstops
« on: December 06, 2004, 05:41:15 PM »

darb

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Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2004, 02:38:26 PM »
Rob, I live in this area but the only one I can tell you about is Texaco town routes 63 & 20 in Pavillion, its probably the same as the last time you were through there, as far as I can tell it has never changed.

 There is a big one in pembroke last I knew it was Union76 but the name may have changed. Its right off thruway exit 48A on route 77.

Rob Archer

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Pavillion
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2004, 03:01:07 PM »
That was the name of that small town.
Thanks

william_wilson

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In Regards of Western New York truckstops
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2004, 11:17:38 AM »
Hi Rob, the One in Cuba, NY is in Belmont, NY along Interstate 86.
The First Picture is a Truckstop Lineup at Truckstops of America in Belmont, NY.



The Second Picture is taken on The Left side of me.



The Third Picture was between The Truckstop and Interstate 86.



The Fourth Picture is where The cars Park. The Main Entrance of behind me.



The fifth Picture is Where The Trucks Pulls in at. If you look very Carefully above The Truck, you'll see the Sign for Truckstops of America.



The Above Pictures were Taken in September of 2004.

The Below Picture was taken in The Begining of November of 2004.



They do Have VERY VERY VERY Nice Food there to Eat.
About 5 Years ago, It was busyer then this year. The business is cutting down. I do hope it will still be open 10 Years down The Raod. I got more pictures if you want to see them? LOL

Take Care Rob and God Bless! Merry Christmas to you!  :D

Anonymous

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2005, 04:31:48 PM »
Hi Rob,
I was just surfing around this site and saw this old post of yours. I don't have a clue as to whether or not TexacoTown is still there...I kind of doubt it....but I sure remember it. It was on the south-east corner of the junction of US 20 and NY 63. And, you are absolutely correct in your description. It was a stop of mine when I was hauling steel leased to Mawson & Mawson out of Langhorne, PA, probably in about 1968. There were not many choices of truckstops along these routes. I was driving a sharp 1959 Brockway single axle conventional with a 220 Cummins and a 5 x 3. It was dark blue with black fenders, red frame, chrome elbow stack extension, and lots of white pin-striping. The same color combo is used to this day by Bolus Freight Systems from Scranton, PA. I pulled a 40' tri-axle table-top trailer and the rig was owned by ABDA Brothers from Olyphant, PA. (ABDA and BOLUS were related by marriage and JOHN ABDA "cut his teeth" at BOLUS' in the 1940's). I would typically haul loads from Bethlehem Steel in Lackawanna NY (Buffalo) down thru NY, PA, and NJ, into the NYC Metro area. The loads were primarily large I-Beams used for structural fabrication for building construction, etc. Some were overlength and required the table-top. Most were overweight with no permits or anything of that legal nature....it was common to load 58,000 to 60,000 lbs of steel when the legal gross was only 73,280. Heck, the tare was around 25,000 alone. Anyway, to the point: Texaco Town had the worst water I have ever seen in my life. It reeked of sulphur and smelled just like rotten eggs. I think that was characteristic of the area. Of course back in 1968, bottled water was unheard of. I remember being so thirsty on a hot summer afternoon and stopping there for fuel; I'd gag on the water they served in the diner...the coffee and iced-tea were just as horrible. Once I had a flat after leaving the mill and after changing it I was somewhat hot, sweaty and dirty. This is when I used to jack up the axle, pull off the wheel...Dayton's...there were much easier than Budds... pull out my small sledge hammer and bead breaker,
and my pry irons to pull apart the split-rim, my patch-kit to either hot-patch or cold-patch the tube, and my hose with an air-chuck on one end and a glad-hand on the other end to air the tire back up when I re-assembled it). Jeez, I'm getting tired just thinking about all the work I had to do just to get rolling again. We sure had to be fairly self-sufficient in those days. At least that's what I had learned to do. Anyway, I decided to shower at TexacoTown. They had a nasty shower but I figured at least the water was clean and so was my bar of soap. Big mistake...I came out of the shower and I swear all I smelled for the rest of the trip was rotten eggs. Never got anything there again except fuel; I think it was about 23.9 cents per gallon! I also remember Betty's Diner as that was further down on Route 63..your description of it is also correct. I had more than one meal there.  Anyway TexacoTown sure was a nasty place as I recall. I was about 19 years old then and as cab-happy as one could get. I had a falsified birthdate on my paper PA driver's license. I thought I was pretty hot stuff. Ah....the good ole days! No Jake brakes, no Maxi-Brakes, no Air-Conditioning, no Power Steering, no Power or comfort anything. Engines: little or no power. But we managed and had fun in the process. I know I did!

Anonymous

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Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2005, 04:34:50 PM »
Hi Rob,
I was just surfing around this site and saw this old post of yours. I don't have a clue as to whether or not TexacoTown is still there...I kind of doubt it....but I sure remember it. It was on the south-east corner of the junction of US 20 and NY 63. And, you are absolutely correct in your description. It was a stop of mine when I was hauling steel leased to Mawson & Mawson out of Langhorne, PA, probably in about 1968. There were not many choices of truckstops along these routes. I was driving a sharp 1959 Brockway single axle conventional with a 220 Cummins and a 5 x 3. It was dark blue with black fenders, red frame, chrome elbow stack extension, and lots of white pin-striping. The same color combo is used to this day by Bolus Freight Systems from Scranton, PA. I pulled a 40' tri-axle table-top trailer and the rig was owned by ABDA Brothers from Olyphant, PA. (ABDA and BOLUS were related by marriage and JOHN ABDA "cut his teeth" at BOLUS' in the 1940's). I would typically haul loads from Bethlehem Steel in Lackawanna NY (Buffalo) down thru NY, PA, and NJ, into the NYC Metro area. The loads were primarily large I-Beams used for structural fabrication for building construction, etc. Some were overlength and required the table-top. Most were overweight with no permits or anything of that legal nature....it was common to load 58,000 to 60,000 lbs of steel when the legal gross was only 73,280. Heck, the tare was around 25,000 alone. Anyway, to the point: Texaco Town had the worst water I have ever seen in my life. It reeked of sulphur and smelled just like rotten eggs. I think that was characteristic of the area. Of course back in 1968, bottled water was unheard of. I remember being so thirsty on a hot summer afternoon and stopping there for fuel; I'd gag on the water they served in the diner...the coffee and iced-tea were just as horrible. Once I had a flat after leaving the mill and after changing it I was somewhat hot, sweaty and dirty. This is when I used to jack up the axle, pull off the wheel...Dayton's...there were much easier than Budds... pull out my small sledge hammer and bead breaker,
and my pry irons to pull apart the split-rim, my patch-kit to either hot-patch or cold-patch the tube, and my hose with an air-chuck on one end and a glad-hand on the other end to air the tire back up when I re-assembled it). Jeez, I'm getting tired just thinking about all the work I had to do just to get rolling again. We sure had to be fairly self-sufficient in those days. At least that's what I had learned to do. Anyway, I decided to shower at TexacoTown. They had a nasty shower but I figured at least the water was clean and so was my bar of soap. Big mistake...I came out of the shower and I swear all I smelled for the rest of the trip was rotten eggs. Never got anything there again except fuel; I think it was about 23.9 cents per gallon! I also remember Betty's Diner as that was further down on Route 63..your description of it is also correct. I had more than one meal there.  Anyway TexacoTown sure was a nasty place as I recall. I was about 19 years old then and as cab-happy as one could get. I had a falsified birthdate on my paper PA driver's license. I thought I was pretty hot stuff. Ah....the good ole days! No Jake brakes, no Maxi-Brakes, no Air-Conditioning, no Power Steering, no Power or comfort anything. Engines: little or no power. But we managed and had fun in the process. I know I did!

Anonymous

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Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2005, 05:07:22 PM »
Hi Rob,
I was just surfing around this site and saw this old post of yours. I don't have a clue as to whether or not TexacoTown is still there...I kind of doubt it....but I sure remember it. It was on the south-east corner of the junction of US 20 and NY 63. And, you are absolutely correct in your description. It was a stop of mine when I was hauling steel leased to Mawson & Mawson out of Langhorne, PA, probably in about 1968. There were not many choices of truckstops along these routes. I was driving a sharp 1959 Brockway single axle conventional with a 220 Cummins and a 5 x 3. It was dark blue with black fenders, red frame, chrome elbow stack extension, and lots of white pin-striping. The same color combo is used to this day by Bolus Freight Systems from Scranton, PA. I pulled a 40' tri-axle table-top trailer and the rig was owned by ABDA Brothers from Olyphant, PA. (ABDA and BOLUS were related by marriage and JOHN ABDA "cut his teeth" at BOLUS' in the 1940's). I would typically haul loads from Bethlehem Steel in Lackawanna NY (Buffalo) down thru NY, PA, and NJ, into the NYC Metro area. The loads were primarily large I-Beams used for structural fabrication for building construction, etc. Some were overlength and required the table-top. Most were overweight with no permits or anything of that legal nature....it was common to load 58,000 to 60,000 lbs of steel when the legal gross was only 73,280. Heck, the tare was around 25,000 alone. Anyway, to the point: Texaco Town had the worst water I have ever seen in my life. It reeked of sulphur and smelled just like rotten eggs. I think that was characteristic of the area. Of course back in 1968, bottled water was unheard of. I remember being so thirsty on a hot summer afternoon and stopping there for fuel; I'd gag on the water they served in the diner...the coffee and iced-tea were just as horrible. Once I had a flat after leaving the mill and after changing it I was somewhat hot, sweaty and dirty. This is when I used to jack up the axle, pull off the wheel...Dayton's...there were much easier than Budds... pull out my small sledge hammer and bead breaker,
and my pry irons to pull apart the split-rim, my patch-kit to either hot-patch or cold-patch the tube, and my hose with an air-chuck on one end and a glad-hand on the other end to air the tire back up when I re-assembled it). Jeez, I'm getting tired just thinking about all the work I had to do just to get rolling again. We sure had to be fairly self-sufficient in those days. At least that's what I had learned to do. Anyway, I decided to shower at TexacoTown. They had a nasty shower but I figured at least the water was clean and so was my bar of soap. Big mistake...I came out of the shower and I swear all I smelled for the rest of the trip was rotten eggs. Never got anything there again except fuel; I think it was about 23.9 cents per gallon! I also remember Betty's Diner as that was further down on Route 63..your description of it is also correct. I had more than one meal there.  Anyway TexacoTown sure was a nasty place as I recall. I was about 19 years old then and as cab-happy as one could get. I had a falsified birthdate on my paper PA driver's license. I thought I was pretty hot stuff. Ah....the good ole days! No Jake brakes, no Maxi-Brakes, no Air-Conditioning, no Power Steering, no Power or comfort anything. Engines: little or no power. But we managed and had fun in the process. I know I did!

Jaybird

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2005, 12:28:39 PM »
Hi Guys. ?I grew up in Western New York in the southern tier area between Hornell and Olean. My Dad was an owner operator threw the 70's into the early 80's. ?I spent as much time as I could riding with my Dad when I wasn't in school. ?I remember we used to load out of Morton Salt in Silver Springs,NY . ?Do any of you remember a little dinner in Dansville,NY just off exit 4 Rt36 south ? Just after you turn right off the exit we would pull on the shoulder . ?It was a little white building that sat on the corner. The old man that ran the place name was Ralph and had an European accent.

Boll Weevil

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2005, 06:43:30 PM »
Good timing!

My run for next Monday and Tuesday begins in Dunkirk and goes up to Tonawanda, across to W.Henrietta, down to Wellsville, and across the Southern Tier back to Bemus Point, with more stops within that circle, 17 in all.

There are currently 2 of the big chains at the Pembroke exit, one on each side of the Thruway. One is a TA, I'm pretty sure the other is a J or a Petro.
Jim

Rob Archer

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2005, 07:09:55 PM »
Watch for LAKE EFFECT SNOW :evil:
One to Two Feet :-o :-o :-o expected tonight.


There were a lot of diners in those little towns like Dansville, Wayland or Bath with room for a truck to park nearby. I think between McDonalds and truckstops like THE J the little places are likely just a memory.



Good timing!

My run for next Monday and Tuesday begins in Dunkirk and goes up to Tonawanda, across to W.Henrietta, down to Wellsville, and across the Southern Tier back to Bemus Point, with more stops within that circle, 17 in all.

There are currently 2 of the big chains at the Pembroke exit, one on each side of the Thruway. One is a TA, I'm pretty sure the other is a J or a Petro.

Boll Weevil

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2005, 08:57:43 PM »
If I have North Java on, I'll pass through Belmont on the way to Wellsville. I don't remember if they were on the list.

According to Accuweather.com, it looks like my biggest weather related concern will be my truck getting dirty. :-(


Quote
? Monday, Nov 28
 Mostly cloudy with a shower possible. Winds from the SSE at 17 mph.? High: 49? F RealFeel?: 39? F

 Monday Night: Considerable cloudiness with a couple of showers possible. Winds from the SSE at 17 mph. Low: 43? F RealFeel: 33? F

Tuesday, Nov 29
 Mostly cloudy. Winds from the SSW at 18 mph. High: 52? F RealFeel: 42? F

 Tuesday Night: Mostly cloudy. Winds from the SW at 17 mph. Low: 42? F RealFeel: 33? F
? ?
Jim

Boll Weevil

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2005, 05:28:06 PM »
Quote
? Dansville There was a Truckstops? truck stop open when the interstate highway to Rochester was put through.

?


Dansville is still a TA, small but a sight for sore eyes when your looking for a truckstop and not expecting to find a TA on I-390.

Belmont is an "All American", that's their sign in the picture up top. They still have the TA style sign at the truck entrance, however.
Jim

Paul Kane

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2005, 08:07:42 PM »
I've never been there but I thing the truckstop on 390 was a Travelport that became a TA when they bought that chain out.

CAN MAN

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2005, 06:25:14 AM »
Dansville has been a gathering spot for Ontario truckers for years, was a guy on with ZAVITZ then with  ZAVCOR with a Red K100  KW AREODYNE that spent more time playing the video games then he should have  :-D

Boll Weevil

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Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2005, 08:07:01 AM »
I've never been there but I thing the truckstop on 390 was a Travelport that became a TA when they bought that chain out.

There still is a Travelport sign out front. I've never heard of them, I thought it might have been a nickname for a small TA.
Jim

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: Western New York Truckstops
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2005, 08:07:01 AM »

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