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Author Topic: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016  (Read 3354 times)

Wee Willy

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2016, 10:10:52 AM »
It's pretty simple Willy. To check the brake stroke on the tractor you need to to release the parking brakes and then apply the service brakes with the brake pedal.  The stick is used to jam the pedal down so that you can hop out and eyeball it.

I'm pretty sure you guys had an old hockey stick or 2x4 for the  occasion.
Actually, no!
We were taught that this is an unsafe practice, and never used sticks or anything else to apply the brakes, except our foot, the trailer spike, or the charge buttons.
 Occasionally we would block the wheels with chocks or wooden blocks, but not for brake inspections.
 It sounds to me like the stick is a lazy man's device, for those who are too lazy, or don't know how to perform the brake inspection in two steps instead of one.
 You have to eyeball the tractor and trailer separately, instead of as a unit.

 But I am old, and not hep to these new fangled ways, like auto shift trannies and using sticks to apply the parking brake.
 I used to actually crawl under the trailer with a 9/16" wrench, or lean over the frame rail of the tractor, and I would move the brake levers by hand, or with a small pipe wrench, or a brake tool if one was handy, but one set of brakes was always engaged, either the tractor or the trailer, and never were both charge buttons pushed in at the same time while I was checking the brakes, because that's just silly!
 
The first rule of the road is:
"If anything can happen, at any time, it will!"

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2016, 10:10:52 AM »

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2016, 03:50:20 PM »
You can use anything.....it just happens that I had old hockey sticks at the time, so that's what got cut up, LOL

I even paint them to match my trucks.
The New Generation: 'You have what we call an irrational sense of entitlement. It won't kill you, but it will cause you to believe that you deserve top pay for doing nothing.'

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2016, 03:54:39 PM »
It's the new MTO generation way Wee Willy. The stick works for me, because with my Brake Safe indicators I just have to bend down on the side of the truck and look.

Now my old Raglan pony trailer on the other hand....it still has manuals, so I just crawl under it every couple days with my wrench. Just as quick to adjust them as it is to measure them.
The New Generation: 'You have what we call an irrational sense of entitlement. It won't kill you, but it will cause you to believe that you deserve top pay for doing nothing.'

Oso2

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2016, 12:55:07 AM »
I was taught to hook to the trailer: that way you could safely release the brakes on one of the units. Chocks are also a good idea.

Then again, all the trucks I learned on had brake stroke indicators. Now that I've moved into the lovely world of driver services though. ..
« Last Edit: April 19, 2016, 12:57:48 AM by Oso2 »
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doug mckenzie

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2016, 04:26:27 AM »
I was taught to hook to the trailer: that way you could safely release the brakes on one of the units. Chocks are also a good idea.

Then again, all the trucks I learned on had brake stroke indicators. Now that I've moved into the lovely world of driver services though. ..

Not to worry ........ discs can be in your future.
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coloradogreen

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2016, 09:56:10 PM »
It's pretty simple Willy. To check the brake stroke on the tractor you need to to release the parking brakes and then apply the service brakes with the brake pedal.  The stick is used to jam the pedal down so that you can hop out and eyeball it.

I'm pretty sure you guys had an old hockey stick or 2x4 for the  occasion.
Actually, no!
We were taught that this is an unsafe practice, and never used sticks or anything else to apply the brakes, except our foot, the trailer spike, or the charge buttons.
 Occasionally we would block the wheels with chocks or wooden blocks, but not for brake inspections.
 It sounds to me like the stick is a lazy man's device, for those who are too lazy, or don't know how to perform the brake inspection in two steps instead of one.
 You have to eyeball the tractor and trailer separately, instead of as a unit.

 But I am old, and not hep to these new fangled ways, like auto shift trannies and using sticks to apply the parking brake.
 I used to actually crawl under the trailer with a 9/16" wrench, or lean over the frame rail of the tractor, and I would move the brake levers by hand, or with a small pipe wrench, or a brake tool if one was handy, but one set of brakes was always engaged, either the tractor or the trailer, and never were both charge buttons pushed in at the same time while I was checking the brakes, because that's just silly!
Screwdriver for me.

Course, if you already have the 9/16 with you, you can adjust then and there...

Wonder when the last time drivers at mega-fleets had a 9/16 for the slack adjuster was...
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Wee Willy

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2016, 05:05:12 AM »
Maybe I expect too much from modern society?

When I was still driving, I set the brakes on every trailer I hooked onto, even after the trailer had been through the safety inspection lane, also on the top of every mountain.

Every time I picked up or dropped a trailer, and every time I stopped the truck, I would thump the tires, eyeball the tires and wheels for signs of damage or signs of oil leakage, look at the oil level of the axles, feel the hubs and wheels for differences in temperature, check the lights, check the fuel caps for tightness, look for signs of damage or wear to the suspension, look for loose nuts and bolts all around the truck and trailer.

 That only took a few minutes of my precious time, ten minutes tops if I adjusted the brakes.
Although not required by the DOT and governing bodies, and while not being paid for my time, I did it for my own piece of mind, so in the event something catastrophic would happen, I knew exactly who was to blame, and for what, no guessing.
 
The first rule of the road is:
"If anything can happen, at any time, it will!"

Oso2

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2016, 04:09:36 PM »
Wonder when the last time drivers at mega-fleets had a 9/16 for the slack adjuster was...

The day before someone realized that they could be sued for having unlicensed mechanics fiddling with their brakes.
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

Oso2

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2016, 04:12:00 PM »
When I was still driving, I set the brakes on every trailer I hooked onto, even after the trailer had been through the safety inspection lane, also on the top of every mountain.

And if you went daycabbing and pinned to 7 trailers per day, would your office be ok with having you take an extra 70 minutes per day to adjust your brakes? No, because it's a totally different world.
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

Wee Willy

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2016, 06:01:01 PM »
First off, at one point in my career, I was hooking and and spotting trailers all day long, day after day.
My "office" as you call it, appreciated the city drivers being safety conscious and taking the effort to do so, they encouraged it.
 
 There you go making things up, saying that my actions consumed 70 minutes of the company's precious time.
 If you read what I said instead of getting your panties twisted, you would see that it only takes 5 minutes to set the brakes on the trailer alone, which would only be 35 minutes a day, if they all needed adjustment.

 To have a crew of drivers taking the time to adjust brakes, the company doesn't waste a whole lot of money on useless, whiney, lazy assed drivers who stand around the shop wasting time while waiting for the mechanics to do it for them, all the while chanting "It's not in my job description, it's not my job. Hurry, I'm late, the office is mad at me, it's your fault, my life is ruined!"

 If truck drivers can't take the time and make the effort to learn how to perform the simplest of tasks, like adjusting brakes and tightening wheel nuts, changing a light bulb, repairing a glad hand, it's no wonder they make minimum wage and are destined for extinction!
(usa truck guy is still the king)

What's this different world you keep talking about?
Southern Ontario and the rest of the known world?
Your world?
My world?
Someone else's world?
The first rule of the road is:
"If anything can happen, at any time, it will!"

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2016, 07:57:06 PM »
Oso's talking about all the drivers we seem to get. They fire up the truck, turn on the four ways and sit inside and have a cigarette. Then mark a half hour on their time sheet for circle check, LOL.
The New Generation: 'You have what we call an irrational sense of entitlement. It won't kill you, but it will cause you to believe that you deserve top pay for doing nothing.'

tery

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2016, 06:16:12 AM »
I was a company driver . For Safety & Liability reasons drivers were not permitted to adjust brakes .
Many new drivers hooked to a trailer and would just drive off without trying to pull out to see if the kingpin was locked , OR applying the trailer brakes after rolling off to check if they even worked !!!
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Oso2

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Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2016, 07:47:16 AM »
My "office" as you call it, appreciated the city drivers being safety conscious and taking the effort to do so, they encouraged it.

Big difference #1.

I was a company driver . For Safety & Liability reasons drivers were not permitted to adjust brakes.

Big difference #2.

And now, some War:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5FfJ89rGPc
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: 226. Greetings from Truck World 2016
« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2016, 07:47:16 AM »

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