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Author Topic: painting tips and tricks...  (Read 2392 times)

4LeggedBucket

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painting tips and tricks...
« on: March 31, 2015, 05:11:38 PM »
 It's not really scale specific but I'm looking to gain some insight from some of the more experienced members on here, all the good stuff from filling holes and sanding to taping and how to get some of those show quality finishes I see posted.

Hank's Truck Forum

painting tips and tricks...
« on: March 31, 2015, 05:11:38 PM »

4LeggedBucket

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Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2015, 07:26:23 PM »
 :o Oh come on lol nobody's got any thing?, dos or donts mabe good and bad paints...

NHRS

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Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2015, 08:50:10 PM »
I would imagine some "Google time" would be helpful, although based on other specialty-interests I have, many so-called experts are still in the food-good-fire-bad stage, so be ready to surf a LOT of websites.

Rather than spend all my free-time cleaning fancy paint-guns, mixing thinner & various colors, & to the embarrassment of friends (God rest their souls) I've always stuck with "rattle-cans", & they're all over the envelope for quality. Basically, when they have a useful color, Testor's rarely lets one down.

Worst thing about "rattle-cans" is, living too far north, & keeping the furnace from running all the time. Rattle-cans & mid 60 F on down doesn't work out real great. Even have warmed the can in hot water.

Got sick of soaking clogged nozzles in thinner (rarely worked anyway), so anymore when one plugs-up, drill out the stem with a #42 drill bit, & the nozzle with a #76. Admittedly, since I model mostly railroad equipment, not real particular (reason I didn't respond, since I'm a poor example).

I'm often amused when modelers get too particular in matching a prototype color EXACTLY, when the prototype fades to various different shades during its life, for a model that will typically be viewed while under florescent lighting, not sunlight.

Probably the best thing that's happened in the last few decades is, the blue masking tape that's available now, when you gotta mask-off for a 2-tone paint-job. It stops the paint from "creeping" underneath much better than the old tan masking tape does.

But, those massive rivets kit-makers think are necessary can really mess-up, that tape staying down flat enough to stop the creep. If I modeled trucks, really think I'd file them off (or at least, down) while building the kit. Think about it the other way. If one had a smooth great looking cab, would one take time to add huck-bolt-sized rivets, row after row?
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

4LeggedBucket

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Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2015, 08:14:19 AM »
 Thanks for reply, I'll take all the tips I can get! I never even thought about the temp range in my basement

NHRS

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Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2015, 09:40:03 AM »
Always best to "test fire" the rattle-can or a paint sprayer first, before shooting at the model.

 Most paints are now compatible with styrene, but all are not. Again, test on some scrap plastic first when in doubt. Also, all paints aren't compatible with each other. Have had models all primered with a base, then "crackle" when my color-coat is applied. Hate it when that happens.

Brush-painting is tough, except in the smallest areas. Large portions of a model (like cab doors, hoods), if brushed, will look like they were painted with a broom.

Also have fair to good luck with the new-age "paint-pencils" for doing small areas, like maybe the chrome trim on the rubber gasket around windshields.

For my locomotive headlights, rather than spend more than I like for real lenses (which may or may not be exactly the correct size), been painting the open-reflector part with a silver paint-pencil. Then when dry, mix 2-part clear epoxy (like Duro makes), drip enough drops of the mix into the light reflector, until a slight convex top-surface is visible. Looks decent when dry.

For tiny areas (like maybe tail or clearance light-lenses in small scales, dipping a pin-head in the paint, then just touch the intended surface works out decent.

When shooting with masking-tape installed, works best if one shoots aimed across the tape toward the intended area for that 2nd color, rather than directly aimed at the masking-tape-edge, which often forces the paint under that edge. Of course, do that too "shallow" with the blast crossing the masking-tape first, can leave a slight "shadow" against that tape-edge. It all gets down to touch & feel.

Rarely got fussy enough to do this, but even in 1:1 scale, when a good friend painted my KW, he'd "double-mask". 1st, masked around the area to be painted. Then 2nd color, mask off the newly painted 1st area, then shoot the 2nd color, so both colors were same exact level as regards the surface (door or hood-sides), not one color slightly higher from the surface than the other.

Scale Coat had a decent paint remover for doing styrene. So far, it's never affected the plastic I've used it on. Some other brands have. Some other strange liquids also work on hard-to-remove factory paint. Have used Liquid Plumber, even brake fluid.

Often, factory lettering can be removed without much effect on the underlaying factory paint with Walther's Solvaset (intended to soften decals so they "snuggle down"). Brush the liquid on with the brush in the lid, let set for about a minute, then rub with a soft pencil-eraser until the lettering is slowly removed.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

4LeggedBucket

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Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2015, 12:32:29 PM »
  I've used nail polish remover and a Q tip to erase logos pinstripes and other lettering with great success of factory painted trucks. I like that clear two part epoxy lense idea!

NHRS

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Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2015, 12:50:13 PM »
  I've used nail polish remover and a Q tip to erase logos pinstripes and other lettering with great success of factory painted trucks. I like that clear two part epoxy lense idea!

Might try a test-run for practice on a surface you aren't gonna use (& make certain the epoxy-choice really is clear).

Like, drill a hole with the end of a drill-bit, just barely deeper than the cutting-edge shoulder. Silver paint that depression. Then, mix small-amount of fast 5-minute-epoxy, dip a pin-head or a small screw-driver into small puddle of that mixed epoxy for a transfer-tool, build up the depression to the top edge, watch across the final surface, to get the slight curvature most headlights will have.

Gotta watch during that process, not to trap any air-bubbles (game-clock's also ticking during that time, with 5-minute epoxy). Of course, if a guy could trap an air-bubble directly on the bottom of the drilled-out hole, would look like a halogen-bulb inside the light-lens.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: painting tips and tricks...
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2015, 12:50:13 PM »

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