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Author Topic: The Rise of the Machines  (Read 15102 times)

NHRS

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2013, 09:50:27 AM »
At this stage, it'll happen much sooner than anybody realizes. Check out the time between Kitty Hawk & the P-51. Then check the time-span from that P-51 until footprints on the Moon.

Was waiting to load back in the mid 90's, an Ore-Ida place, western Wisconsin. Frozen boxed onions rings were coming down the conveyor to be palletized & machinery was doing that (had a cage around them, so nobody could wander in, get hurt).

2 crane-type machnines picked the boxes off the end of the conveyor. Looked like models of oil-field walking-beam pumps, with a tropfer-type flourecent-light frame, holding rows of suction cups. They'd line it up over the last 3 boxes, & pick'm, set'm on the slip-sheeted pallet. They were keeping track, so finishing a tier, then turn the next row to establish a tie-pattern.

After making the required number of tiers, they pallet would shove off, next pallet roll in. I was a real gas to watch these loading machines place the new slip sheet on the pallet. They'd pick it off a stack of sheets, & flair it out, like a grandma putting a table cloth down, or putting sheets on a bed.

The strangest thing was, when there was a lull in boxes coming down the conveyor, these guys would park, literally wherever. They didn't always return to the same de-fault position. I didn't expect that one.

A few yards away, a machine all by itself would shrink-wrap the palleted boxes by itself. The pallet was on a turntable, so it would spin while the machine started the wrap doing. Every 5 or 6 pallets, he'd forget to pull his start-the-warp-out arm out of the way in time for the next layer, & wrap his arm in with everything. The turntable would then stop, an human was notified someplace, & a real person would come with a box cutter to fix things, & restart.

I was in the walkway by the cage so I told the guy, "That's what I'd do. Make'm keep doing it 'til they get it right".

He laughed, told me they'd had factory service guys come out, check on the problem, & they claimed there was no problem. Almost like the machine knew to be on best behavior when Dad was around.

And, this was nearly 20 years ago. Those machines could be playing cards on break by now.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2013, 09:50:27 AM »

RedStapler

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2013, 06:11:59 PM »
Thought I'd bump this back up with a recent article from the Truckers Report:

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article titled “Daddy, What Was A Truck Driver?” In it they predict that the future of commercial trucking lies in self-driving trucks. All the non-drivers quoted in the article agree that it’s not a matter of if, but rather a matter when… including the director of engineering and safety policy for the ATA, Ted Scott, who said that ubiquitous, autonomous trucks are “close to inevitable.”

http://www.thetruckersreport.com/ata-self-driving-trucks-are-close-to-inevitable/

Oso2

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2013, 09:24:55 AM »
Thought I'd bump this back up with a recent article from the Truckers Report:

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article titled “Daddy, What Was A Truck Driver?” In it they predict that the future of commercial trucking lies in self-driving trucks. All the non-drivers quoted in the article agree that it’s not a matter of if, but rather a matter when… including the director of engineering and safety policy for the ATA, Ted Scott, who said that ubiquitous, autonomous trucks are “close to inevitable.”

http://www.thetruckersreport.com/ata-self-driving-trucks-are-close-to-inevitable/

Oh I could just imagine what a class act company like the Montreal Marine and Atlantic Railway could do with automation. 

We've been able to automate planes and rail for some time now - and yet we don't. There's a reason for that.
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

NHRS

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #18 on: August 09, 2013, 10:45:57 AM »
That reason is mostly public PR, and taking good jobs away from registered voters. Most machines are already far more reliable than the guys who run them.

We'll know the cross-over has been made when, after the initial appearance of Drone-trucks, their safety record will be so good that their insurance liability price will be lower than that for human-operated trucks.



If you don't ask, they can't say no.

Oso2

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #19 on: August 09, 2013, 03:00:43 PM »
That reason is mostly public PR, and taking good jobs away from registered voters. Most machines are already far more reliable than the guys who run them.

We'll know the cross-over has been made when, after the initial appearance of Drone-trucks, their safety record will be so good that their insurance liability price will be lower than that for human-operated trucks.

Agreed. But never discount the power of PR to trump reason. Especially when jobs are involved.

On the other hand, judging by the current state of affairs, truckers are a politically apathetic lot.
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

NHRS

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #20 on: August 09, 2013, 07:18:42 PM »
True about PR trumping reason....if everything else is even.

Add to the equation, drivers who don't like to shift, many drivers who don't like to see where they're going (you've seen the visors), so work-force apathy is sadly alive and well.

But, I think the real deal-breaker will be insurance, and those who score cheaper insurance rates will be competitive with freight rates. Money talks, and BS (in this case, PR) walks.

In the 50's India was still making brand-new steam locomotives...without stokers. They just hired TWO firemen, instead of having only the one needed for large locos that were all stoker equiped everyplace else. India knew the value of making extra jobs for everybody.

Nobody plays the game that way now. Our railroads, traditional 5-man road crew for decades, are now down to two guys, tops.

PR will trump reason, but it won't trump money.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

gman41

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2013, 12:02:34 PM »
So what happens when the machine breaks....what happens when someone hacks it and sends it haywire crazy.

NHRS

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2013, 12:48:49 PM »
Redundancy kicks in. It transmits an alarm for record & notification about the event so maintenance is prepared, & the machine either ties up right there out of the way, or limps on home.

Even now, what's the point of humans? Nobody even carries a spare tire anymore. If present-day drivers were actually doing anything, they'd be screaming about NOT being able to slide underneath & check things out. You've seen the photos of present-day cab-interiors. That plush atmosphere is for a passenger-attitude, not an operator. A real operator is focused on the gauges, the sounds & smells, the view ahead & in the mirrors, NOT how great the upholstery is.

Keep in mind, if a guy like me who loves trucks can figure this one out, it's falling off a log for those who hate trucks.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

hwyhaulier

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2013, 04:51:18 AM »
NHRS - All -

Well, it is hard to locate and recruit good drivers these days...

We are seeing these results, all over the board, of the endless and decades old drumbeat that it is only
fair that all have college degrees. This gets us good scholars of works of Shakespeare, but more difficult
to find good machinists and electricians, and so on...

Didja' ever notice with all the enforced demands, colleges have a mind of their own about what they
think they are worth per credit hour (and fees). BAH! Few want to stop and think that most of the work
of the engineering (making aircraft fly, and so on) of the World War II Era done by many who didn't hold
so much as a High School Diploma...

................................Vern..........................


NHRS

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2013, 05:27:19 AM »
10-4 on the attitudes. Not really sure it isn't planned that way on purpose.

Example- a job requires a college education, which has little to do with the actual on-the-job hands-on activities. Basically to justify that, the claim is, completing college shows the discipline the new-hire developed to accomplish that.

In our present era, that also shows the strong possibility of a horrible student-loan burden. Which means, no matter how far the real work is removed from the join-us-PR, the poor kid is gonna put up with that, rather than go looking around anymore.

Drove for a small family-owned truckline right after I ended my 28 years of O/O. We were in an area with 2 good drivers for every driving job, & the local wages reflected that. The young family member who ran that small truckline was overheard one day, looking out his 2nd-story office window, at the driver's parking lot, where all the beautiful show-room condition 4-wheel drive pickups sat.

He expressed how he enjoyed looking at all that beautiful daily-driver equipment, because all that beautiful equipment had high monthly payments. Those high payments meant that nobody turned down any cheap paying loads in the evenings if the markets changed, after they'd already driven all day.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

funcruise

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #25 on: August 27, 2013, 02:49:30 PM »
First they need to teach the computer to back a 53 footer into a dock made for a 40 footer 60 years ago


  Amen brother.......

NHRS

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #26 on: August 27, 2013, 03:03:32 PM »
The computer will do it as good as the best, & without the gashes in the sides that occur during the human learning curve.

About backing into horrible places, had a close friend decades ago lease on with a very reputable meat hauler. His 1st load with his brand-new Timpte refer was to NYC. He got there mid afternoon, checked in, & discovered their receiving dock was back in an alley, & on down another narrow alley, after the mid-block "T" alley intersection!

Of course, he was less than thrilled, especially when they told him it would be after 10 that night before enough delivery trucks had left, so they'd have room for him. He waited in dread out in the street & about 10, was told they were ready.

They had him square up to back down the alley, which they'd lined with railroad ties against the walls alongside, while guys with brooms & buckets of grease painted the cobblestones, "T" intersection & all.

He could have backed down that alley with his eyes closed, since he was like a switch engine pushing a boxcar.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

RedStapler

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #27 on: September 30, 2013, 01:14:25 PM »
American Society of Mechanical Eng. article:


Already the Stanford Audi has performed on the Utah Salt Flats, climbed Pikes Peak and raced to 120 mph on California’s Thunderhill Raceway, finishing the twisting 3-mile road course in under two and a half minutes. That’s all without someone sitting behind the steering wheel, and the track time is slightly less but comparable to a standard race car driven by a professional driver.


https://www.asme.org/engineering-topics/articles/automotive-design/selfdriving-cars-speed-ahead?cm_sp=Transportation-_-Feataured%20Articles-_-Self-Driving%20Cars%20Speed%20Ahead


LocalCoilHauler

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Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2014, 03:43:03 PM »
Just came across this article on DC Velocity about dock automation:



Are robots taking over at the nation's loading and receiving docks? Not exactly, but as our November 2012 story on Frito-Lay's robotic truck loader shows, they're making inroads into what were once human-only domains


http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/2030325-could-robots-take-over-loading-and-receiving-docks/
The one question:

Will it still take 4 hours for them to put two pallets on a trailer?

Troy.
When I read that I instantly thought of this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPgCD-JdYDc

All I gotta say is SH** Is Coming
It's Appearance might be Half yours but it's Reliability might be Twice yours!!

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: The Rise of the Machines
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2014, 03:43:03 PM »

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