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Author Topic: CN Transportation  (Read 104085 times)

Dan Burkhart

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2011, 06:59:43 AM »
Dan: I'm enjoying these memories of 30 odd years ago.
You said that CN closed intermodal ramps at London and Belleville in favour of Brampton?
Both those points are major yards for CN trains. I believe they are both crew change points for trains from Toronto.
There was a big terminal in Hamilton down by Stuart Street.
I saw it about three years ago and there was a GTL Glengarry sign still on it.
By last March, though, it had been razed.
I believe it might have been a CN Express terminal before GTL moved in.



The terminals remained open, they just stopped ramping the piggyback trailers. For the first year or so, they still had local drivers doing the p&d at the terminals, but they gradually went to a load and go system, and ultimately, we did all p&d out of Brampton all over Ontario.
 Guelph kept one local driver on though, to pull out of Imperial tobacco. They kept pretty close control on those loads. The CN police were notified any time one was moving, and we were to go non stop to the rail yard.
 Same applied to booze loads, but we picked those up at the distilleries.
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2011, 06:59:43 AM »

LocalCoilHauler

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #61 on: January 18, 2011, 01:08:32 PM »
For Jim G! ;D
BB309 is in the "Locomotive" paint.

That shot is a beaut!!!!!! ;D ;D I love the new locomotive scheme on the CN trucks!!
It's Appearance might be Half yours but it's Reliability might be Twice yours!!

JJG

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #62 on: January 18, 2011, 11:27:20 PM »
For Jim G! ;D
BB309 is in the "Locomotive" paint.


There you go Rob!! I see it, I like it, and so you have answered my question about CN locomotives in Toronto!! Thanks!

Jim

The Snowman

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #63 on: January 20, 2011, 07:54:28 PM »
On Airport Rd. south of Queen St. ( Hwy 7) there is a smalll yard of around 30 to 50 CN locomotives paint scheme trucks. Noticed when I drove passed there last week.

JJG

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #64 on: January 21, 2011, 12:18:54 AM »
On Airport Rd. south of Queen St. ( Hwy 7) there is a smalll yard of around 30 to 50 CN locomotives paint scheme trucks. Noticed when I drove passed there last week.

Sounds interesting Snowman, I don't think my "zoom' is quite 3000 mile capable!! We'll leave it to the Ontario cameras!

Jim.

Dan Burkhart

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #65 on: January 23, 2011, 05:42:14 AM »
 Now that I'm caught up in a reverie of years long past, I'll talk a bit about the piggyback trailers that CN had.
 About the time I started pulling them around, they had a big push on to renew and upsize the fleet, but they still had lots and lots of old trailers that predated CMVSS121. That meant no spring brakes of course, but that was nothing new to me, I hadn't seen many spring brake trailers before that anyway.
 When they put a trailer on the train car, the brakes need to be released for travel to allow them to roll freely for the little bit of motion allowed by the support column. This was so the bearings wouldn't get flat spots, or at least that's the reason as explained to me.
 The new spring brake trailers were built with extra reservoir capacity, and a release button, so that the brakes could be released when disconnected from the power unit. The older trailers, they just opened the tap on the reservoir and let the air out.
 The reservoirs were not easilly accessible on a lot of the old units, and this was particularly true of the old wide frame rack and tarp flatbeds.
 In those days, east bound freight from western Canada to Ontario was scarce, and they would put any freight they could find on those trailers to load them eastbound.
 So, what do they have lots of in western Canada? Slaughter houses, and they generate hides.They would load green salted stinking dripping hides on those things and we'd have to pick them up and deliver them to the leather factories in Kitchener, Acton and Hastings. Bad enough having to duck under the trailer to close the air valve before connecting so you wouldn't chase the trailer all over the yard, but these trailers almost always needed a brake adjustment before they were safe to move, because nobody else, it seems, owned a 9/16ths wrench.
 Well, most times, I would just get under the trailer and make adjustments, but with that goo dripping down, I said no thanks. I'd always run them over to the shop and let the mechanics deal with it.
 Anyway, sorry to get so long winded. I'm just sitting around with nothing to do for a while. Hope I bring back some memories for some of you guys.
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

R Nagle

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #66 on: January 23, 2011, 01:11:59 PM »
Quote
sorry to get so long winded
No need to be! These stories are fascinating and a superb way to learn about trucking - couldn't ask for a better "history lesson"!

Rob Archer

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #67 on: January 25, 2011, 06:41:53 AM »
No Strike At CN
(January 25 2011)
CN reaches tentative contract settlements
with Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) union

CAW cancels plans for CN strike on Jan. 25, 2011

MONTREAL, Jan. 24, 2011 CN (TSX: CNR)(NYSE: CNI) announced today tentative contract agreements with the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) union. With settlements, the CAW has dropped plans to strike the railway at 0001 hours Eastern time Jan. 25, 2011.

The agreements would, upon ratification, provide fair wage and benefit increases to CAW members. In addition, the settlements contain progressive provisions that would help CN retain and attract skilled employees critical to its workforce in the years ahead.

Full details of the tentative agreements are being withheld pending ratification, which the CAW expects to complete before the end of February, 2011.

The CAW represents approximately 3,975 workers in four distinct bargaining units at CN and CNTL (a subsidiary of CN) mechanical, clerical/intermodal , excavator operators, and owner-operator truck drivers.



Things would have been pretty dull around the CN terminals and on the roads if the strike had gone off. All those "locomotive" trucks would have been parked.

Rob Archer

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #68 on: January 25, 2011, 06:47:51 AM »
Dan: Did you ever read the Diesel Gypsy's story of hauling hides back from the west and getting stopped on the scales?
FLYING LOAD

Back in 1958, when I was running for A & H and H & M Express Lines, (same company, different destinations). We were running day and night. We would be hauling premium general freight to the western part of Canada. To get a fast turnaround, we would haul any thing we could get our hands on. Usually a straight load of whatever. Military, Hydro cable reels (M/T) or even hides from the slaughterhouses. That was the load on this particular trip.
Normally, they would be picked up in a folded, salted and dry state, tied into neat square bundles and tagged individually. At that time the Russian's would send in a ship to the docks in Montreal, to pick up a shipload of hides for export. At this time they were trying to get this load down east before the deadline. So when we showed up for the load, it was in such a rush that it was loaded GREEN. Which means that they were off the animals back within the hour.( producing and loading directly) The hides were still draining, slop & blood and were not even salted. (That is what they mean by green hides.)

It was in the middle of August and the temperature on the prairies was in the 90's. The load had to be loaded for axle weight, for going through the United States. We had no sliding axles at that time, so it had to be done by hand, then run over a scale till it came out correct. We started across the praries,(2 drivers running double)In the extreme heat. About 3 or 4 hrs. down the line, there was a car tailgating our trailer. Without a cloud in the sky for over 100 mi. I could see in my mirrors, that he was running with the windshield wipers on, and starting to swerve a little erratically. He quickly pulled off and I went down the road for about another 5 or 6 mi. then pulled over also. My curiosity getting the best of me. I was a little, but not totally supprised, that the blood and liquid crap was running out of the back doors. I had to run for my life, so it seemed at the time, it was not only draining liquid, but was also being devoured by a MILLION (or more) horse flies. The biggest I had ever seen. A giant swarm. I jumped back into the cab, closing the window and taking off down the road, trying to out run the flies. Remember, in the 50,s air conditioning did not exist. It must have been well over 100 F. in the cab.

We crossed over to the US at Noyes, Minnesota. Having the load sealed in bond on the Canadian side first.( with the flies catching up and attacking the customs officers we were promptly told to get the hell out of there. A day later we were travelling the US highway route # 2, east bound. We came around the corner at POWERS MICHIGAN scale shack. They were open for business, and they loved nothing better than to nail the Canadians for any fines that they could scrape up. Well I pulled ahead onto the scale and weighed the steering axle, then pulled the drive axle on. he stopped there and called me inside. Showing me that I was 2,000 lbs. to heavy on the front. In the meantime, a herd of horse flies caught up to the load. Being on the scale and the shack window wide open, with crap still dripping out on the ground.(on the scale) He said he would give us a break, if we could move the freight back to a legal position, he would let us go. He also knew that we did not have any sliders and that the load was customs sealed in bond,and could not enter the trailer.

Well the load being so greasy and slippery, that when we made a panic stop, the load shifted forward, and made our weight illegal. I pulled off the scale and drove like hell in revers, then slammed on the brakes, slowly shifting the load back again. Then pull back on the scale for a reweigh. After dripping all over the scale and reweighing 3 times, to which I was almost legal again. The stink and the flies were attaching the shack and the scale man so badly, that he chased us out of there and in no uncertain terms, told us what he thought of us, and would be looking forward to an excuse to throw us in jail at a future undisclosed date. So away we went , followed by the biggest herd of flies I had ever seen. The Canadian customs at Sarnia Ontario, gave us the fastest clearance I ever had. I have never seen a government man move that fast in my life.The next few weeks, I made sure that it was my turn in the bunk and out of sight, when we went over the POWERS MI. scale.

Bill Weatherstone




 In those days, east bound freight from western Canada to Ontario was scarce, and they would put any freight they could find on those trailers to load them eastbound.
 So, what do they have lots of in western Canada? Slaughter houses, and they generate hides.They would load green salted stinking dripping hides on those things and we'd have to pick them up and deliver them to the leather factories in Kitchener, Acton and Hastings. Bad enough having to duck under the trailer to close the air valve before connecting so you wouldn't chase the trailer all over the yard, but these trailers almost always needed a brake adjustment before they were safe to move, because nobody else, it seems, owned a 9/16ths wrench.
 Well, most times, I would just get under the trailer and make adjustments, but with that goo dripping down, I said no thanks. I'd always run them over to the shop and let the mechanics deal with it.
 Anyway, sorry to get so long winded. I'm just sitting around with nothing to do for a while. Hope I bring back some memories for some of you guys.

Dan Burkhart

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #69 on: January 25, 2011, 07:15:32 AM »
Dan: Did you ever read the Diesel Gypsy's story of hauling hides back from the west and getting stopped on the scales?
FLYING LOAD
Bill Weatherstone

Great story, and no, I hadn't read that one. I've read some of his stories, but I guess I missed that one.
The hide loads on CN's rack and tarp trailers were not quite as messy as he describes, but they were still stinky and dripping.
 Ironically, Manfred Rhuland (not sure of the spelling) was part of the group that purchased Route Canada from CN in the 80s. He was best known as the owner of Cadline trucking, who was best known as a hauler of hides.
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

JJG

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #70 on: January 25, 2011, 10:38:58 PM »
No Strike At CN
(January 25 2011)
CN reaches tentative contract settlements
with Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) union

CAW cancels plans for CN strike on Jan. 25, 2011

MONTREAL, Jan. 24, 2011 CN (TSX: CNR)(NYSE: CNI) announced today tentative contract agreements with the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) union. With settlements, the CAW has dropped plans to strike the railway at 0001 hours Eastern time Jan. 25, 2011.

The agreements would, upon ratification, provide fair wage and benefit increases to CAW members. In addition, the settlements contain progressive provisions that would help CN retain and attract skilled employees critical to its workforce in the years ahead.

Full details of the tentative agreements are being withheld pending ratification, which the CAW expects to complete before the end of February, 2011.

The CAW represents approximately 3,975 workers in four distinct bargaining units at CN and CNTL (a subsidiary of CN) mechanical, clerical/intermodal , excavator operators, and owner-operator truck drivers.



Things would have been pretty dull around the CN terminals and on the roads if the strike had gone off. All those "locomotive" trucks would have been parked.

Thanks Rob, I would have had to go into hibernation if that happened!

Jim.

Rob Archer

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One for JJG Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #71 on: January 29, 2011, 06:45:11 AM »
Here's a white CN truck Jim, but check the unit number: BB02
Maybe the high senority drivers couldn't be forced to spend the money on a "locomotive" paint scheme.


Picture was from February 2010.

PS, I saw a "locomotive" Freightliner the other day that wasn't with CN any longer but had MMTX decals. That's one of the Transforce container divisions.

Rob Archer

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #72 on: January 29, 2011, 07:01:55 AM »
Another from last year...April on the QEW near Dixie Road


JJG

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #73 on: January 29, 2011, 05:43:42 PM »
Thanks Rob, yeah, BB02 may have some seniority. There are several here that are white too and I should really have taken pictures of them but I was just on a locomotive mission I guess..................no hard feelings to any one of you guys who own/drive a white one!!

Nice catch on the QEW, I think the Columbia has to be the most popular followed by the Volvo?? It's great t see the variety.

Jim.

Pascal Pion

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Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #74 on: February 08, 2011, 06:33:46 PM »
So I had a nice chat with the owner of the truck BM 94,a Mack Vision day cab. Regarding the paint code,here is what he told me:

-Numbers bellow 100 are not required to paint their truck. It's like a privilege they have.They can paint them if they want but it's not mandatory to them.

-Oldest truck remaining in the Montreal fleet,seniority wise is BM 16,a brand new white T800 day cab.

-Numbers above 100 and new starter in the company must paint their truck within a year.
War is the terrible ransom that humanity has to pay for it's stupidity...
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Hank's Truck Forum

Re: CN Transportation
« Reply #74 on: February 08, 2011, 06:33:46 PM »

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