Author Topic: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE  (Read 3734 times)

Professional

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Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« on: December 18, 2009, 12:53:55 PM »
Mr. Becker,  Maybe you can shed some light on this oldie.  I worked for PIE in the early 80's and I loved finding this storage trailer at an Army surplus store.










Paul Kane

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2009, 01:02:01 PM »
Oldie is an understatement on that one!

Greg_E

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2009, 01:13:47 PM »
Indeed. It looks to be older than time itself, I wonder if it's even good for storage.

Updated: 11/22/14

John L. Becker

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2009, 01:39:00 PM »
WOW!  :-o :-o :-o

There is a classic! The rear sill has a Gramm-built look to it but I can't say for sure.
Check out the OLD fold-up style of landing gear!
And the lettering is awesome...can we say "before vinyl decals"?  :? :-D
Thanks for sharing!
« Last Edit: December 18, 2009, 04:59:22 PM by John L. Becker »

wbache

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2009, 02:52:15 PM »
I have lived in territory served by PIE since the late 40's and don't remember ever seeing a trailer like that. It has to be pretty old. A real piece of history.

Ray F

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2009, 11:18:18 PM »
Cool Catch Professional  8-) 8-) BTW Please Tell me that Pallet is just Sitting there and not being  used as a "Ladder"  :| :|

Jimmy B

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2009, 02:07:26 AM »
Jim,

That was a real find! Thanks for taking the time to fire off a photo and then sharing it with us! When I spot those kinds of things I get kind of excited...

Jimmy B

hwyhaulier

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2009, 04:34:13 AM »
Professional - All -

Many Thanks in passing along this Oldie. Conjecture Of The Day? A pre WWII build (compare with newer equipment shown in They Drive By Night).
Sheet metal patches, and newer vents, in front view, suggest this started as a reefer unit?

P I E was a much different place back then, of course. Several Intermountain Region carriers enjoyed steady moves of cheese and dairy products.
In the era, practical trailer refrigerator apparatus became available. Ken Goudy, in his published works, provides much detail of this evolution...

.......................Vern.................
« Last Edit: December 21, 2009, 01:48:29 AM by hwyhaulier »

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2009, 02:04:56 PM »
Thanks John,  I got a kick out of the folding landing gear.  I'll bet it got interesting in the winter caked and frozen up.

Vern,  I think you are onto something with that rear door it does seem like a dairy application or was that the norm, no access for a lift truck to get inside?

Ray, I would bet the ladder is some what recycled......

Pretty good shape for IMO at least 70 years old.

Jim

dockmen027

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2009, 03:37:51 PM »
Nice find!

That's not the origional door, you can see the origional door hinge in the forth photo.

What is the year on the license plate?

Is there a tag with a serial number and a build year on the nose?
John K

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2009, 03:58:50 PM »
Good observation Dockman027 catching that original hinge.  I'm not sure about the license plate but I did look for some kind of manufacturer's plate and could not find anything.  Hopefully someone will give some more info.  Jim

Brockway

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2009, 06:15:07 PM »
That trailer can't be pre-ww1. It has glad hands so it had air brakes. My father started driving in 1936 and he told me that air brakes or any brakes for that matter were non existent on trailers. Here is shot taken in 1939, it's hard to see but there are no air lines connected to the trailer just a single light cord. Carl









When Twin Golden Huskies Pass You...... It's HUSKIDRIVE!

hwyhaulier

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2009, 02:01:37 AM »
Carl - All -

Thanks! I made a typo on original comment, and just edited to read "WWII"...

Note I referred to, "They Drive By Night", released 1940. Film done so well, it also a bit of a documentary of the trucking scene at date...

I don't know what to read into the "fourth photo" above. Seems to me the steel "angle" framing shapes possibly a post build modification?
Same way with the side door shown in the photo group. I'm partial to possible earlier use as a cheese trailer...

.........................Vern..................

Brockway

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2009, 02:31:48 AM »
Hello,
  Does anybody actually know when brakes became mandatory on trailers? Dad's long gone I cant' ask him! I also remember him telling me CT. was the first state to require electrically lighted turn signals.He used to tell me about lighting the kerosense lanterns when it got dark.He also told me about having to run "dark" on Rt. 1 in CT and RI because of the German subs in Long Island sound during the war.  The pictures I have from pre-ww2 show a arrow and handle to pull for making a left hand turn.These new requirements must have been in place sometime in the 40's. Like I had said he started driving shortly before 1936 before the ICC established their rules and regulations so at that time the states were able to establish rules on their own.

When Twin Golden Huskies Pass You...... It's HUSKIDRIVE!

Jimmy B

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Re: Pacific Intermountain Express PIE
« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2011, 12:26:59 AM »
A fellow that I met at the last Sierra Nevada Chapter show mentioned a book by Samuel W. Taylor called "Line Haul." It's the the story of Pacific Intermountain Express, published by Filmer Publishing Co during 1959. I found a copy on the web and ordered that copy, it came about a week ago. I've started to read it and from what I've read so far, this is a very informative book. It certainly should be on a list of anyone that is wanting to learn about LTL trucking in the 1940 and 1950s. I found this copy for $17.00 plus tax and shipping, it was well worth the expense.



As a bonus, as I was leaving through the book, I found the above pictured business card. Maybe, it belong to the owner of this book, who was the branch manager of the terminal at Waterloo, Iowa.

Seeing how it wasn't until 2009 that I got a "bid" truck with air conditioning, I found this passage interesting and true to form.

"It is hot in the cab..."
"How about this desert run in the summer?"
"Hank Shaffer indicates that aluminum box (dog house). 'It gets so hot you can't put your hand on it. Sometimes I put a quilt over it.' The heat used to bother him, but of recent years he doesn't mind it so much. It's partof the job. 'You just have to take it.'"

Hope this helps someone pursue trucking history!
« Last Edit: June 22, 2011, 12:46:28 AM by Jimmy B »