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Author Topic: Truck Safety  (Read 7303 times)

itbracer6

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Truck Safety
« on: September 13, 2006, 06:47:42 AM »
I'll admit I'm new to the trucking business compaired to most of you ( less than 10 years) here but It seems to me that although the HOS is susposed to make the industry better it isn't working. I do a mail run from St. Louis to Springfield to Big cabin Ok and return back to St. Lou 3 days a week and I don't think I work a day where I don't see a truck incident. LOTS of roll overs mainly due to driver falling asleep or stupidity. Has it always been this way?

Personally I see several problems with the HOS rules. I know the independents aren't going to like this!!

1. Why is the average americas work week 40-50 hours and a drivers is expected to be 60-80? I personally like the drivers who tell you the are making 1000 to 1500 a week but they don't mention the fact that @ 60-80 hours they worked 2 jobs to do it.

2. Every co. I've worked for, the dispatcher seems to throw away the rule book ( this includes the Post Office who"s contract I haul for). My turn is 688 miles door to door and the truck is governed at 67 with a company policy of 65. If you look at 392.6 it states that 600 to 660 miles would be considered to be illegal.

3. It seems that everyone is cheating on log books in one way or another. Loging load time as bunk time, etc.

4. a large percentage of drivers don't do pretrips, even at a minium. Then they complain when they get shutdown by DOT.

I am only touching on the surface here. 

What bothers me is driver safety. A few months ago I watched a driver die ( couldn't help him as he was crushed with the truck). He was hauling a load of onions out of Texas and fell asleep. What bothers me most here is that he died for a load of onions. I don't know about you but my life is worth more than that.

Thanks for letting me rant,

Bill

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Truck Safety
« on: September 13, 2006, 06:47:42 AM »

Wee Willy

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2007, 04:50:17 AM »
I'm surprised no one has answered this yet.
Then again, most of it has been discussed before, and  it could be a nasty topic.
Having said that, the remarks you see here, are mine, and mine alone, as I see it, which is not neccessarily, someone elses opinion.

Quote
'll admit I'm new to the trucking business compaired to most of you ( less than 10 years) here but It seems to me that although the HOS is susposed to make the industry better it isn't working. I do a mail run from St. Louis to Springfield to Big cabin Ok and return back to St. Lou 3 days a week and I don't think I work a day where I don't see a truck incident. LOTS of roll overs mainly due to driver falling asleep or stupidity. Has it always been this way?
.

The HOS is, making the "industry" better,(more profitable), at the expense of the driver.
Always has been that way, a bunch of big wigs from the government, get together with big wig representatives of industry, and each has a hidden agenda, which is to maximize profits, and you are a source of revenue to them.
 On paper, you can run XXX miles per day, which is what they look at, and in a perfect world, (their world), they expect you to be able to do it.
 In the real world, (drivers world), it's impossible, and you are forced to comply, put yourself at odds with the authorities, and if an incident occurs, (accident, log book violatin, etc), they have their asses covered, and they are always hopeful, that you don't. (keep copies of everything, carry a camera, shoot anything that they may try to charge you for, dents etc )

About the truck incidents/accidents.
They always existed as well, but not to the same degree as today.
Drivers will always fall asleep, and stupid people have always existed, except that there are a disproportional number of stupid people on the roads these days.
This is a subject I get emotional about, and will avoid it, because my opinion is not a nice one.
I'll just say, people should be forced, to act more responsibly.

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1. Why is the average americas work week 40-50 hours and a drivers is expected to be 60-80? I personally like the drivers who tell you the are making 1000 to 1500 a week but they don't mention the fact that @ 60-80 hours they worked 2 jobs to do it.
(I was making 900.00 to 1400,00 a week, back in the late seventies, busted my ass)

Tell your boss you only want to work thirty to forty hours a week.
You are not bound by law, or obligation, to work 80 hrs a week.
If he don't like it, there's no shortage of driving jobs, and anyone with ten years experience is, an in demand commodity these days, go find a job that you'll be happier with.
Maybe you would like heavy haul, rural delivery, log hauling, the choices are endless, as are opportunities.
Become a part time driver, like I did when I got fed up, be your own man.
I ran spare for a few O/O's, drove big shiny trucks, with big engines, got paid cash in advance, had very few responsibilities, and worked 2 or 3 days a week.
Life was great!

Quote
2. Every co. I've worked for, the dispatcher seems to throw away the rule book ( this includes the Post Office who"s contract I haul for). My turn is 688 miles door to door and the truck is governed at 67 with a company policy of 65. If you look at 392.6 it states that 600 to 660 miles would be considered to be illegal.
Already covered, except dispatchers.

A good dispatcher, is a rare commodity, many are snivelling managerial wanna be's, and you are their lackey.
Don't take crap from them, if they ask you to do the impossible, tell them politely, that the letter of the law, doesn't allow it. (or grab em by the neck, and drag them over the desk, for an eye to eye chat)
Or you can alter your log book, which could cost you, or go see your union if you have one, your decision again.

Quote
3. It seems that everyone is cheating on log books in one way or another. Loging load time as bunk time, etc.
Has been this way, for as long as I can remember, you do what you got to do.
It's about big brother, covering his ass, and baring yours.

Quote
4. a large percentage of drivers don't do pretrips, even at a minium. Then they complain when they get shutdown by DOT.
Again, all about choices, or being lazy, it's their money.

Quote
What bothers me is driver safety. A few months ago I watched a driver die ( couldn't help him as he was crushed with the truck). He was hauling a load of onions out of Texas and fell asleep. What bothers me most here is that he died for a load of onions. I don't know about you but my life is worth more than that.

Unfortunately, many of us during our careers, see people die, but that's what happens on the road.
People take too lightly, real danger that exists around them, and are easily distracted from the road.
I think we need more, and better enforcement on the roads, with zero tolerance, (cell phones, speeding, tailgating,etc), at least for the amount of time it takes, to train the general public, to act responsibly.

Bottom line,
If you've done any serious driving, you know that you have to be vigilant, and aware of everything around you, and expect the worst at all times.
You can't count on the other guy, because there's an 80% chance, that they are stupid, and will do the wrong thing, at the wrong time, every time.

Trucking has not changed at all, in some ways, since I started in the seventies.
Truckers are still cheating on their logs, some are still bitching, stupid people still exist, no one is doing anything to make things better, truckers can't be organized, no one wants them to organize, and that's the way it is.

If you want a better world, don't expect someone else to make it for you, do it yourself.
Little things do matter, and if everyone had the conscience, and made a personal commitment to make things better, they would be. (I do my part, just ask some dispatchers, and terminal managers I've spoken with)

If you work for a jerk, tell them so, then go find a better job, and a better job doesn't always mean, "mo money."

This may not be what you want to hear, but this is what I've got to say, hope it helps.

The first rule of the road is:
"If anything can happen, at any time, it will!"

Rob Archer

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2007, 11:14:33 AM »
I can't frame that rant.....but I should.
Well written.


SEMI-CRAZY

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2007, 11:58:08 AM »
I have to agree with everything written there.

Good job :-D

I was going to write my feelings down here but I just don't have the time.

Gary Smith

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2007, 06:03:55 PM »
Listening to the local traffic reports over the last few years, I notice that there seem to be a lot more tractor-trailer accidents (most, mercifully without serious injury), at least one every other day.

Is it the pressure to meet schedules?

Is it the 30-day-wonders being turned out by the driver mills?

Is it the carriers desparate to put warm bodies in cold seats that hire them?

Is it maintenence corners cut due to cost pressure?  (We had a wheel-loss incident on I-95 here back in early December which caused a fatality to a motorist on the street below the overpass)

All of the above?

I believe that our industry has always struggled with image problems, and this stuff sure doesn't help.



It's a Mack thing. you wouldn't understand.....

"Every highway, just beyond the high beams"

Wee Willy

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Gary Smith
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2007, 12:35:47 AM »
All of the above!
The first rule of the road is:
"If anything can happen, at any time, it will!"

doug mckenzie

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2007, 01:49:10 AM »

Today the FMCSA in the U.S. announces their stand on Electronic On-Board Recorders, or Black Boxes.

If many of you feel right now the picture isn't pretty, I doubt that it will change much.

I have no problem with current changes in H.O.S. - worked pretty well a day shift anyhow, but I've also said many times that if you want all of this "safety" stuff and burden my responsibilities further, as has been done with other "professionals" such as airline pilots, then pay me for that "professionalism".

But no carrier will.
The industry cannot support the rates.

So as far as I'm concerned, with E.O.B.'s being the next thing, there will be a further decline in the quality of the industry as more "experienced" hands drop out with all of the non-sense.
Right-wing Old School.

shunter

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2007, 03:36:18 PM »
Listening to the local traffic reports over the last few years, I notice that there seem to be a lot more tractor-trailer accidents (most, mercifully without serious injury), at least one every other day.

Is it the pressure to meet schedules?

Is it the 30-day-wonders being turned out by the driver mills?

Is it the carriers desparate to put warm bodies in cold seats that hire them?

Is it maintenence corners cut due to cost pressure?  (We had a wheel-loss incident on I-95 here back in early December which caused a fatality to a motorist on the street below the overpass)

All of the above?

I believe that our industry has always struggled with image problems, and this stuff sure doesn't help.




Yes.

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2010, 03:41:58 AM »
I've heard a lot of drivers complaining (And I don't mean as in cry baby complain)  about the new CSA2010. 
Scott W. Pryer

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wis bang

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2010, 04:13:55 PM »
I've heard a lot of drivers complaining (And I don't mean as in cry baby complain)  about the new CSA2010. 

That is because several of the 'new' areas being watched are driver related. Kinda backwards as the fleet's corporate policies promote the negative driver actions. Yes there were always the few 'bad apples' that wanted to disregard all rules and quit instead of following the company 'way' BUT most drivers are just trying to make a living and bending the rules was part of that ever since the wheel was invented and some guy hitched up a horse and talked someone to drive it...

The same economic pressure that drove most manufacturing overseas has pitted one trucker against the other so the cheapest one wins. Cheapest always winning means the driver is always loosing.

The benefit of CSA 2010 will be that the DOT will concentrate on what they think is wrong and try to force the fleets to fix that instead of coming in and doing a comprehensive audit looking in every nook and cranny. They feel that audits tie up their limited resources while the focused approach lets them spread out and work on what they feel is wrong.

The problem is their goal is zero fatalities. Short of removing all the 4 wheelers and rebuilding all the roadways to be more truck friendly, the won't be able to do it. Every time I see a reconstructed road I look for the signs that the engineers didn't have a clue about the space and turn radius needed for truck traffic to flow safely. Every 'new' exit ramp I see has some transition that is not meant to let trucks flow safely, that contributes to the number of roll overs on ramps...

Unfortunately finding the money to upgrade the whole country won't let the driver make what he is worth! Ever wonder why they seem to have no clue why they can't find enough good drivers?

Ghost in the shell

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Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2010, 11:55:07 AM »
one way they could deal with slip roads on Interstates, is put  them onto roundabouts at the base with a wide radius, make them longer and not quite so steep. 

also, after passing car tests, new car drivers should be sent around a test track in a big rig, so they get to know how much room one takes to stop, as the nexyt big rig they cut up may be the one that squashes them! 


Hank's Truck Forum

Re: Truck Safety
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2010, 11:55:07 AM »

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