If you enjoy this web site, please show your support.

If you enjoy this web site, please show your support.

Truck Driving Jobs

Author Topic: One piece windshields  (Read 17563 times)

coloradogreen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2704
    • 10-4 Magazine
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2011, 11:14:47 AM »
Not sure I ever noticed much of a difference when in a truck... from inside Bob's truck:


Troy.
Your friendly neighborhood vegan heavy haul punk.


"Suzie-Q"

IMAGES COPYRIGHT TROY MILLER/ 10-4 MAGAZINE

Contributor 10-4 Magazine

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2011, 11:14:47 AM »

BraedenS359

  • Regular Membership
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2013, 02:52:24 AM »
The one-piece windshields increase aerodynamics and reduce drag. However, as others have said, they are much more expensive to relplace if it gets damaged, rather than just having to replace one pane. Also, from what I've noticed, the one-piece's do not pop out like some of  the two-piece's did. And if, say, a rock chips your window, you now have to pay 2x-3x more to replace it rather than 1 side, which means more cash money to the truck companies and dealers.  I personally love the 2-piece shields.

NHRS

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4568
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2013, 05:39:21 AM »
From what I've seen, & admittedly I don't give the new stuff much of a look-over, the new-age windshields go for curvature at the outside corners. That means distortion in that area, big time. Distortion is a very bad idea, when it's hard to ever see everything from a cab you need to see anyway, so say nothing about the fact, a truck is always wrong until proved right if things end up in court.

That skinny center pillar is no aerodynamic setback whatsoever. Check out some airliners that cruise at around .82 Mach. (And that limit is in regard to the turbulance at the engine-intakes, since designing intakes for faster than .82 would have entailed some trade-offs that were more important)
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

BraedenS359

  • Regular Membership
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2013, 11:56:19 AM »
Awesome point, NHRS. And doing more in depth research, I've noticed that many trucks that have 2 piece shields have them set in a slight "V" pattern, acting as a wedge that cuts through the air more efficiently. Thanks for making me notice that :) A  gentleman who works at a Kenworth shop in Westville, IN told me of the supposed "benefits" of a single curved windshield (among other things) when I was checking out a T2000 they had in the parking lot. He said they were more  aerodynamic and I never thought anything of it, just  went along with it.  But could those "benefits" really just be marketing gimics to make you want to buy that  product more and  then turn around and pay the extra $$$ when it gets broke or chipped?   And heres a random thought that pertains to  this: check  out the Thomas Saf-T-Liner C2 buses. Whats up with their windshields? And who in the right  mind would've designed something like that?

NHRS

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4568
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2013, 01:17:49 PM »
10-4 on the "V back" toward the sides. And, "slicker" in the wind. That characteristic slant was virtually Pete's trademark for decades. Sadly, the 1st Freightshaker conventionals had the center-post, but kept their windshields almost flat with each other. I never thought that looked real hot.

I remember when the newer style rubber gasket for mounting the windshields began using a rubber tube in the middle after installation to snug everything together. The option soon came out to have that chromed, sadly rather cheaply. Looked great....for a couple of years. Tarnished yellowish &/or began peeling off. The solid rubber ones looked better far longer.

Works on show-car black tires, so don't know why-not on shieldshield gaskets, so I'm thinking about trying it. Just rub good ol' Vaseline into the rubber to give a darker color again & a slight shine. Better than peeling-off chrome.

But, aerodynamic windshields are no factor whatsoever, considering that a cool-looking sunvisor is gonna stick out & catch LOTS of wind. I'd take that tradeoff anytime, & if I need the mpg back, I'll just cruise 5 mph slower. Skip one coffeestop, & I'd be right back on schedule.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

norseman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 37817
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2013, 02:36:07 PM »
I've always kind of wondered why the two piece windshield has survived so long on American trucks while over here in Europe the truck manufacturers haven't offered two piece windshields since, what, the mid 70s or so, I'd say. Not saying one is better then the other (although I've always kind of preferred the look of the one piece style, possibly because I am most used to that), just saying I've always wondered about the reason for this.

Jan.
"Advertisements contain the only truths to be relied on in a newspaper." - Mark Twain

NHRS

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4568
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2013, 02:54:44 PM »
Could be a flex thing. American cabs, especially cabovers (long way across, side to side) are as light as possible, & that means there's gonna be some flexing. Since glass won't do that, the middle pillar & assoicated rubber gaskets helps out, without anything getting broken.

Don't know the weight of those Europian cabs, but just from looking, they looked very heavy. Which of course, also means they resist flexing a lot more.

Also, that center pillar has almost no effect on down-the-road vision. Sit back in the driver's seat sometime, look out over the hood at the road ahead, from just over of the radiator to about 1/2 mile away (where 90% of the action is that demands an immediate response occurs). That area is almost as small as a dinner plate.

You know it's big enough. Check out how much windshield is still available for the driver's view when the new-age sun-visors hang down toward the hood so low they look like an armored halftrack on Normandy.

Wanta see something extra small on something extra big? Ocean liners rarely counted on windshield wipers for decades, so they went for small spinning windshield areas, which spun fast enough to toss the rain & ocean spray off. Check out those very little centrifical windshields on the bridge of the old Queen Mary.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

doug mckenzie

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2889
  • Doug McKenzie
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2013, 05:16:54 PM »
Could be a flex thing. American cabs, especially cabovers (long way across, side to side) are as light as possible, & that means there's gonna be some flexing. Since glass won't do that, the middle pillar & assoicated rubber gaskets helps out, without anything getting broken.

Don't know the weight of those Europian cabs, but just from looking, they looked very heavy. Which of course, also means they resist flexing a lot more.

Also, that center pillar has almost no effect on down-the-road vision. Sit back in the driver's seat sometime, look out over the hood at the road ahead, from just over of the radiator to about 1/2 mile away (where 90% of the action is that demands an immediate response occurs). That area is almost as small as a dinner plate.

You know it's big enough. Check out how much windshield is still available for the driver's view when the new-age sun-visors hang down toward the hood so low they look like an armored halftrack on Normandy.

Wanta see something extra small on something extra big? Ocean liners rarely counted on windshield wipers for decades, so they went for small spinning windshield areas, which spun fast enough to toss the rain & ocean spray off. Check out those very little centrifical windshields on the bridge of the old Queen Mary.

NHRS: Those little centrifical windshields such as on RMS Queen Mary are known as Kent Clear-View Screens. England's Royal Navy used them for decades on their warships, including those between the 1st and 2nd World Wars when the Royal Navy had a certain penchant for the open-style ship bridge - as opposed to the enclosed bridge favoured by the United States Navy.
Right-wing Old School.

mailtrucker

  • Regular Membership
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 53
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2013, 05:37:12 PM »
I loved my one-piece windshields on my Pete 362's, they had three wipers. Then I moved onto Pete 379's and KW W900's with 2-piece with no problems either. Now I'm using a W900 with a one-piece and I don't like it. The ends have too much distortion and the way the wipers are setup they're a pain to try and grab to clear of ice when you're driving.

Btw, the last W900 two-piece I drove the original drivers side pane was just changed out with 980k miles on it, the passenger side has been changed once. Many of our one-piece ws trucks have cracks in them.

NHRS

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4568
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2013, 06:06:50 PM »
Thanks Doug! Never knew anybody well enough, who I thought could answer about those windshields. Very glad you told me.

When my oldest kid (50KW) was in junior-high, he basically lived on the truck with me all summer. He loved the HMS Queen Mary, so we'd leave the trailer back in the yard, & bobtail to Long Beach & spend at least a full day on her. We both loved those open "docking bridges" out on the sides of the enclosed bridge.

I've seen lots of pictures of the North Atlantic, which was home waters for the Royal Navy. Those who love open bridges in those seas gotta be extra tough.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

NHRS

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4568
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2013, 06:28:36 PM »
I always hated driving from cabs with heavy-on-the-curve-at-the-edge windshields. That gave distortion in the area where you get one last look from a stop sign before crawling out onto a road, which was a definite safety issue.

When KW 1st came out with their 'box' type cabover, after the bullnose, they didn't go for that curved stuff. They had a skinny little pillar at the end of the large flat windshield, with a small flat windshield on the side back to the door pillar.

Never admired things when styling surpasses function & safety, as we see lots of today. Lot of people forgot what they're out there for.

Back in the early 50's, Popular Science had a major article, listing in their opinion, the 10 most beautiful cars ever (up to that time, & most still are today).

They had the obvious ones, pre-war Lincoln Continental, Duesenberg, Cord, & of all things, the WW2 Jeep. And, they were dead on right. Perfect function-mandated styling, totally no BS whatsoever. I remember when some design guys with nothing important to do & too much time, tuned that Jeep design up for the Korean War. It was like "Ugh!".

The 1st time I saw the KW "A" cab around 64, compared to the original, it looked awkward. Almost thought they used a kindergarten art class for their design department (in fact, for at least that 1st year, for $500 bucks extra, KW would build you the old one instead). But as time went on, & things became even more awkward looking, it grows on you. To this day, park those 2 designs together at a truck show, & I'll walk you around both, & show exactly where the older one's better looking & better made. That full-length piano-hinge on the cab door's a tough act to follow.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

NHRS

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4568
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #26 on: March 18, 2013, 06:33:55 PM »
On 2nd thought, HMS for the Queen Mary might be wrong. Think maybe it's RMS, for Royal Mail Ship.

And, as I understand it, when a British Ship flys the "Red Duster", the Captain's in the Royal Navy Reserve. I think that means, if something bad happens during a voyage you're on, you might/might not still be going to where you thought you'd go.
If you don't ask, they can't say no.

doug mckenzie

  • Regular Membership
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2889
  • Doug McKenzie
Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2013, 07:41:05 PM »
On 2nd thought, HMS for the Queen Mary might be wrong. Think maybe it's RMS, for Royal Mail Ship.

And, as I understand it, when a British Ship flys the "Red Duster", the Captain's in the Royal Navy Reserve. I think that means, if something bad happens during a voyage you're on, you might/might not still be going to where you thought you'd go.

Thought you might enjoy the clarification - even if it hi-jacks and diverts the direction of the thread.
I have an interest in 2nd World War history - Father was a veteran of the Canadian Army, drove a Diamond T tank transporter through England, North Africa, Sicily, Italy and a bit of France and Germany before being repatriated home just before the conflict's end - funny thing is, I have no interest in our Army's history, just our Navy and Air Force's.
Right-wing Old School.

Hank's Truck Forum

Re: One piece windshields
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2013, 07:41:05 PM »

Truck Driving Jobs