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Author Topic: How about the Ford H series?  (Read 11000 times)

Tom

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How about the Ford H series?
« on: August 14, 2003, 10:07:58 AM »
I've always liked the Ford H series trucks. I also liked the first version of the Ford W series. I would also throw another vote with the Mack R model.

Hank's Truck Forum

How about the Ford H series?
« on: August 14, 2003, 10:07:58 AM »

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Rob Archer

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FORDS
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2003, 12:33:14 PM »
Didn't Ford make a pretty fair owner- operator tractor in the 80's?
The LTL 9000 with the Aerodyne(type) sleeper and the CLT 9000 with the double wide sleeper. These were similar to the KW's, Petes and Freightliners of the day.
The areodynmic bunk on the LTL couldn't be called Aerodyne though as that was a Kenworth registered trade mark.

doug mckenzie

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Ford H Series.
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2003, 05:27:06 AM »
While we're commentng about Ford's CL and LTL series trucks, I seem to remember that one particular advertising slogan had something to do with thinking of them as "a big Lincoln"......

Well, after having driven heaven knows how many LT's and CL's in both fleet finish and "high style" with both fleet and o/o spec powertrains and also having prevously owned 3 Lincoln Town Cars, ......

There's absolutely no way I'd ever think of those things as being anywhere near a Lincoln product save for the blue oval.
Right-wing Old School.

can man

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clt and ltls
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2003, 06:30:41 PM »
Doug, As a firm believer in the ford heavy trucks in the 1980's, I cannot help but question the reason of your unlikeliness to associate the CLT's and Louisvilles to a lincoln. As the owner of many ford models, in both standard and "Custom Hi Level" interior trim, I have nothing other than positive feedback on Ford's Commitment to quality. The Ford Lousiville cab has been one of the most comfortable and practical in the industry. From caramel piping paired with the linehaul instrument panel to 36 ounce carpet floor mat, the inside story of comfort and convenience is quite obvious. Ford also offered a wide aray of paint schemes in classic, Hi Liner and free spirit styles. Designed with longevity in mind, the LTL, CLT and LT models meant business in big trucks. I would associate my Fords with nothing other than "Big Lincolns". One may have been confused at the though of long road trips in the family Marquis with Grandma in the back seat knitting various sweaters and cardigans though. But I am not a psychologist, merely a truck driver with a passion for Ford trucks.

carol jo

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CL9000
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2003, 08:10:23 PM »
Doug,
I was disapointed in your view that the Lincoln had no comparison to the CL9000. Although the CL9000 is a highway truck I feel for the time Ford engineers made a damned good attempt at providing the best in driver comfort. Like a Lincoln you had to pay for these extra creature comforts.
  First off in the early part of my driving career I ran a double bunk with air ride cab CL9000 spec'd with Neway air ride on a 220" wheelbase powered by a pre 3406 Cat  block. This truck rode unbelievale compared to the International S series I just came out of. The CL9000 was like driving an air matress floating on a calm lake. It took a little getting use to and sometimes felt mushy and you had to be cautious in the corner cause it had a tendancy to drift. Some livestock haulers banned them cause drivers were roarin down rough roads and the cattle beasts were all over the pot.
  I felt I was riding high above the competition in my 2 story Edsel, ride was smooth,visibility was great and everything on the dash was at your fingetips. Maybe Doug you didn't get the chance to run one of these full air ride Fords cause other drivers said the single bunk no air ride cab or suspension CL9000's rode like a tank. Maybe like cheap whiskey they left a bad taste in your mouth and yes I would believe they had no comparison to a Lincoln.
  There was also some downfalls to the big Ford and as miles went by they had their share of maintenace issues. Like owning a Town car there was my fair share of times I had to get a cab home from the Ford Lincoln Mercury dealer because my CL9000 was in for more repairs only to return to find a big fat bill for overpriced parts and repairs. Sometimes it was just nickel and dimes stuff but it all added up to downtime we didn't need. They were proned to problems with the cab air ride like blown or leaking airbags. The actual cab was not reinforced enough at the back cause inside the luggage compartment floors and backwall cracked cause this is where the rear cab mounts latched on to the cab. The frame mounts for the exhaust brackets also cracked. Inside there was 3 heater and the heater cores would rot and you had to go to Ford to buy these overpriced heaters. It seemed to be Ford stuff but I pity the poor trucker in say 1978 that would have ordered a CL9000 with an 8V-92 screamin Detroit, cause this green grenade and the CL9000 was a recipe for bankruptcy.
  Anyways Ford's slogan was A Better Idea and I think at the time Ford engineers did give truckers a ride that was comparable to a Lincoln. Too bad Ford didn't fix up some of their problems that plagued this  Lincoln's big brother.

RodeoJoe

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How about the Ford H series?
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2003, 11:18:25 PM »
Have you ever stopped to think about why you don't see any of those blue oval trucks on the road anymore?

ddot430

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How about the Ford H series?
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2003, 10:46:32 AM »
i always loved the CL9000 and C9000 cabovers - you usely saw them at freight companies like PIE and Willig
See you on down the road jack!!

doug mckenzie

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How About the Ford H Series.
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2003, 04:46:14 PM »
Canman and Carol Jo can have their Fords.

Pay ATTENTION CHILDREN because Roadeo Joe has just told you.

DO YOU SEE ANY NEW BLUE OVAL BIG TRUCKS?

There's absolutely no way, no way that anything Ford ever built that was called a big truck would ever have anything in comparison to a Lincoln.
They were, are and always will be, CHEAP.

Canman, take a look at the swtiches and controls in your prized Louisvilles ...... they made their debut in the '50s.
I agree that the Louisville cab can be big, comfortable and whatever else you want to call it, but while you two puppies were still doing your trucking on your knnes I was driving a Louisville for years that had a curious "ticking" noise coming from the right rear corner where the exhaust stack was bolted to the cab. The carrier I drove for took the offending muffler off, re-worked the mounts several times and still the ticking persisted.

It ended one cold winter night when a night driver spun out on glare ice on Hwy.401 and Hwy.25 and put the right muffler through the right rear corner and the passenger seat on the dash.

And before you gentlemen think any more about Blue Oval big trucks, let's go back to the W Series .......

I can only compare driving one of those disasters as comparable to working all day delivering to frozen food warehouses. I'm sure you can think of how the cold eventually gets to your ankles, your knees, your hands and your nose is constantly running.

Well, at $36.50/hr today, I'd rather spend my time in a cold storage facility finger-printing french fries as opposed to even thinking or remembering about the disaster called a WT-9000 that I once drove.

At least in the frozen food facility, I can go outside, get a rotten cup of coffee and get warm.

Gentlemen, do some trucking.
Right-wing Old School.

Rob Archer

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Were all Fords Crap?
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2003, 07:54:26 PM »
Reimer ran a lot of Fords. They ran the W1000 series, then the W9000 series, CL9000's, LT9000s, LTL9000s, LTA9000's (set back steer axle and the Aero-bullet sleepers??)
All those trucks ran in some pretty cold weather.
Did all the drivers freeze their knees, ankles, hands etc while driving those trucks through Northern Ontario and across the prairies?

I thought that Ford did make a concerted effort to improve their product with the CL line especially.

Now I remember that OVERDRIVE magazine didn't say too much good about Fords.
Yes, they must have been slapped together, Ford was typical fleet tractor during much of the 70's and 80's.
We read many of the same complaints about Freightliners today.

Doug; Was the carrier a "DeGroote" line?

But as to why there aren't anymore tractors with the Ford logo, it has more to do with corporate ambition and overly ambitious CEOS at both Ford and Freightliner. The executives at both companies who made the deals are gone.

mike b

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Ford CL-9000
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2003, 05:47:51 PM »
Hi guys

Thanks for all of the info on the ford product line.. I have always been curious about the CL-9000s preformance and durability??  I can not remember seeing an abundance of Cl-9000s out here on the west coast,  but the few I saw I thought had a "unique" look to them especially the ones equipped with the large sleeper and air ride cab..  

Rob, I can personally vouch for freightliners lack of attention to cab construction and heating and air conditioning systems in their newer FL-112s, hot feet in the summer and cold ones in the winter.. In all fairness I also must add that I have had very good experience with the freightliner FLD-120

__________
mike b

doug mckenzie

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Ford H-Series.
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2003, 10:40:47 AM »
So, how did a simple comment about Ford's H-Series get into this chin-wag about all of their products?

First off, I can't say whether or not Reimer's driver's spent their trips across Canada wrapped up in blankets to fight off the cold.

What I will say is that in the summer, if the Louisville didn't have the tinted windshield, YOU BAKED. It was fairly warm in the winter but like many trucks of it's time and today, when it became extremely cold, the heater often wasn't up to the task.

Where my comments concerning the W-Series are focused is simply that the truck was junk from the word go.
The cab never felt as though it was properly secured. The doors creaked and worked back and forth as the cab rode along. Even with the winter front, of bra as everyone likes to call them today, the heater was seldom up to the task on extremely cold days. That's where the cold ankles, knees, fingers and such come into place. On more than one occasion a strong wind would blow snow into the cab through what you would think were closed door openings.

It didn't have power steering, and learning how to drive all over again was an experience. Everyone should try it!

As for the CL.

Canman and Carol Jo: REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 1977.

From bare bones fleet to high style, the CL wasn't without it's problems too.Leaking roofs. Cold again. I took one trip from Scarborough to Montreal in one particular CL, loaded with 74,000 lbs of glass and pretty well froze all of the way. The problem?
Luxury CL's had heater controls on the driver's side of the cab, the bunk and ON THE PASSENGER SIDE. Guess what? A defective control valve for the passenger side controls regulated the fact that on that trip, there wasn't going to be any heat until the sun came up.

The tilt and tele steering wheel in both the Louisville and the CL made either truck much more comfortable to drive, but that took a long time to come and in fact I'm not sure the CL even had that option.

And the CL's air ride cab!
Try the speed limit on the Trans-Canada at DeCarie in Montreal, Carol Jo. In a full air ride CL cab, you won't try that again if you've managed to keep your breakfast or lunch inside you as you feel you're going to fall over. Since that really was such a BETTER IDEA, where are all the rest?

Ford can, in my books, stick to what it does best. Build pick-up trucks and cars. And I've had my share of poor Ford cars too.
Right-wing Old School.

carol jo

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blue oval shines
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2003, 11:46:51 AM »
I just want to say I'm not necessarily a fan of Ford trucks but as in my forum on the CL9000. I felt AT THE TIME Ford engineers did provide truckdrivers a ride and creature comforts that were like a Lincoln. After coming out of a Canadian spec Intenational S Series with 60" spread Hedrickson suspension.  The CL9000 with the fancy owner operator interior and the smooth ride made me feel like I was driving a Lincoln.
 Like I stated before I know the CL9000 was plagued with many mechanical problems right from the word go I never did argue this. Maybe they were cheap or did they not test products properly at the time to last. It's funny a lot of that lightweight cheap stuff Ford used back then is standard now as manufactures make trucks cheaper and lighter. Ford was always a production line truck not a custom made truck.
 As I stated before yes driving the CL9000 was something to get use to. If you hit a series of bumps on the road this truck started acting like you were riding a mechanical bull. With one hand on the shifter and the other hand on the steering wheel, look out cause this wild thoroughbred would give you a crazy ride till you cleared the bumps. It wasn't a bone jarring experience like with a Hendrickson spring suspension but the CL9000 going over bumps was more like an air matress in a wave pool. A little out of control but good on your back. I enjoyed driving this truck but I thrive on conquering a challenge.
 I drove a Mack Ultaliner for a short while and this thing with Neway air ride and a air ride cab gave almost the same wild ride over bumps as the CL9000. I use to haul plate and coil steel out of Point Claire Quebec. This Mack also gave you a mechanical bull type ride. I remember hitting some pretty hard bumps and if you didn't have stuff secured in the bunk you were lookin for trouble. I remember on one or more occasions hitting roadbumps and poor Casandra my blow up doll would come crashing out of the bunk landing on the doghouse and my 9 piece chicken McNugget lunch would be a 2 piece and with Casandra all bruised up this would leave me no choice but to hit the single stage Dynatard engine brake and pull the big Mack over and pick up my chicken buffet. Did I complain, NO, I was young and havin fun truckin and I'm still havin fun trucking.
 Doug sorry to hear about the W model icebox on wheels you drove and too bad the heater controls on your CL didn't work. But in the winter I found my CL warm and cozy.
 As for where are the blue ovals now, welcome to corporate America boys where everything is merged or bought out. I guess the blue oval is hiding under the Sterling nameplate. Still a Ford just mounted on a Freightliner frame. Maybe the oldtimers wandered when Pacific Car bought out Kenworth and Peterbilt. Same can be said about Hayes another well built truck just another victim of a corporate decision. Good or bad who knows. But always bad for the consumer. Less selection and higher price.

K-Whopper

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Ford Versus Mack
« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2003, 10:32:03 PM »
Pardon me... but did Mack borrow their Ultraliner cab design from Ford's CL/CLT 9000 cab? Anyone got any info on that...?

palamar5

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Fords..........
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2005, 05:29:16 PM »
The Class 6,7 and 8 tractors from Ford were sold to Frieghtliner one year after their new redesign.  Ford did this so they could concentrate on the new Super Duty series trucks that were selling so well.  I think the Super Duty pickups are made at the same factory where the class 8s were built.
The Fords were a great fleet truck for the most part.  They made a great owner-operator truck for those who wanted something a little different.  We had used Fords at K&R Express for years, all the way back to the H series and N series.  I would prefer a vintage LTL9000 over a run of the mill Kenworth, Pete, Freightliner etc. anytime.  Most of the Fords in K&R's fleet were reliable.  We had some tractors that were puchased used from Pepsi and Coke; these had major air leaks around the back windows and the windshields.  The spring suspension tandem axles rode worse that a single axle spring suspension.  We had a few Ford OTR sleeper rigs over the years that the drivers really liked; they were speced O/O style.  The Ford L8000/L9000 is a great P&D and linehaul tractor, that why they were built and used for so long and that's why the Ford/Sterling is popular today.

CAN MAN

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How about the Ford H series?
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2005, 04:48:49 AM »
Was not this CAN MAN  that posted about FORDS  :shock:

As for not seeing the BLUE OVAL anymore FORD sold out the HEAVY TRUCK division to MERCEDES BENZ / FREIGHLINER  now called STERLING.

They took the $ and bought the car division from VOLVO  :lol:

Hank's Truck Forum

How about the Ford H series?
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2005, 04:48:49 AM »

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