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Author Topic: Outback Bound  (Read 12593 times)

MAGMAN

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2007, 08:40:04 AM »
Thanks for the update Terry. They are sure some nice looking trailers. The reason I asked is that in Europe a lot of the tanks used for hauling wine are finished in much the same way. But I figured there wouldn't be much call for a wine tanker in the NT! I have heard about Marshall-Lethlean and will hold them in high esteem from now on. Much obliged.

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2007, 08:40:04 AM »

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DingosGotMyBaby

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Re: Outback Bound (Part 2)
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2007, 12:17:48 AM »
Part 2: The induction of Stuart James McColl to the National Road Transport Hall of Fame...

Outback bound was much quicker this time, on the plane! As I boarded, I walked past my old boss sitting proudly in business class with an empty seat beside him. With my quick wit I thanked him for saving me a seat, but with quicker wit, my near 90 year old boss told me "you go down to steerage young fella and make yourself comfortable :wink:.There were family members, friends and six long term drivers accompanying a man who gave so much for his “family business” and we left a cold winter morning in Melbourne and landed in hot Alice Springs... wearing long pants and a jumpers.
The Hall of Fame had fully transformed from trucking museum to auditorium with tables and seating for 500 guests. After a brief speech from the Town Crier and the Mayor of Alice Springs, the names of the inductees were slowly read out with a brief story of who they were and why they were so special in the history of Australian road transport. When his name was read out, there wasn't too many people who didn't know Stuart or his company McColls Transport...

Hanging proudly on the Wall Of Fame was a framed photo with the following story (I helped write)...

Stuart McColl was born on the 3rd of October 1917 and raised in the lush dairying country of Port Fairy in the heartland of the Western Districts of Victoria. His formative years were spent farming up until the outbreak of the second World War where he joined the Army, seeing service in New Guinea and Darwin with the 2nd A.I.F. achieving the rank of 2nd Lieutenant.
  After the end of hostilities and once demobbed, he returned to Port Fairy to resume farming along with his passion for lifesaving and becoming Scoutmaster.
  In the late 1940’s, early 50’s he moved into the Geelong region to take up managership of the Polar Dairy of Bloomsbury St. Newtown. In 1952, Stuart and his wife June, bit the bullet forming McColls Milk Transport and began farm milk pick-ups. Little would they realise that this tentative start would blossom into the largest family owned milk transport in Australia.
  From humble beginnings utilising two F600 and later ‘K’ model Bedford tray trucks, Stuart would do a milk run dropping empty cans and returning to Polar with full ones. He had been known to deliver 16 milk cans crammed into the boot, front and rear seats of his Jaguar Saloon. To help the farmers out when picking up cream and eggs, he would also deliver bran and pollard.
  His original depot in Maude Street was very basic in that era. Stuarts office seating consisted of an upturned milk can with a block of sponge rubber for a cushion, when using the telephone he would have to duck out and turn off the compressor so he could converse. Indeed the workshop was so pokey that the trucks would have to be moved out of the shed when servicing was required.
  McColls Milk Transport continued to grow, with Stuart buying out his competitors and in the late 1950’s, JC Brown built McColls first semi-trailer tanker, a single axle unit of 1834 gallon (8344 litre) capacity, which is has been refurbished and donated to the National Road Transport Hall of Fame.
  There were a variety of prime-movers including a bonneted Albion, a Perkins powered Commer also a Dodge pulling a 30-foot semi. It would not have been unusual for drivers to do up to 22 pick-ups in the Queenscliffe area once a day. Other localities serviced were the Barrabool Hills, Ceres and Freshwater Creek
  The company then branched out into general freight and chemical tankers, contracting to companies such as Blackwell IXL and Rohm and Haas, where the trucks would be parked because of size restrictions at the Maude St. depot.
  1981 saw the then new depot built at the current site on Barwon Terrace, enabling Stuart to centralise his entire fleet, now being joined by the Mercedes-Benz brand, a love affair for the marque which continues to this day for Stuart and June. Ford, Volvo, International, Mack, Scania and later Kenworth were to be added to the roster.
  It is interesting to note that about 20 years ago, Stuart had the opportunity to sell out and retire from the hurley-burley of road transport, but declined for the driver’s sake, the company being quite a large local employer with dependant families.
  The 1990’s saw McColl’s take over farm pick-up division of Nestle’ of Tongala, open a general freight shed in Sunshine as well as committing to a Sydney interstate depot.
  The turn of the new millenium saw Stuart still coming into work on a daily basis, looking after the company’s wide spread fleets insurance needs, although having been succeeded well beforehand by his son-in-law, David Stevens as General Manager.
  2005 saw McColl’s Transport sold to the huge Dutch banking conglomerate, ABN AMRO, with both Stuart and David retiring. Over the years, Stuart and his eldest son Peter (also a long serving member of the company before retirement) have been heavily involved in Rotary, Stuart having been presented with the Paul Harris Fellowship Award for meritorious service. Younger son Mark, was also involved in the company business at various times, whilst daughters Susan (David’s wife) and Jenny round out the family.
  Stuart would be the first to admit that his early tennis playing days are well behind him, but he and June spend quite a bit of time at their holiday home at Torquay, overlooking the beach and still look forward to their annual trips to Noosa. It could be well and truly said that before retirement, Stuart James McColl was totally devoted to his business. He also was quite passionate about his Geelong Cats. A lot of the locals as well as the older employees have fond memories of the Geelong Football Club emblem being sported around on a shiny McColls milk tanker.
  Stuart still drops into the Barwon Tce. yard on the odd occasion, usually to call out hello to a few of the ‘old boys’ or ‘young fellers’ as he likes to say. One thing for sure is, even if Stuart doesn’t know a few of the newer employees names, it never stops him giving you a cheerio or good-day.
  It is certainly fitting that the Board of the Road Transport Hall of Fame has recognised Stuart McColl’s contribution to not only the transport sector, but to industry as a whole.

After the ceremony it was time to relax over lunch and a listen to band sponsored by Freightliner called Ruckus. I was so pleased to see the owners of the museum take the time to talk to Stuart and personally thank him for the donation of his first ever milk tanker to their collection. This made up for the cold shoulder I received when I delivered it, but then again, I am only a truck driver and should be used of that by now. It wasn’t my tanker and I didn’t personally donate it...I only drove 5000km on my own time. Watching Stuart laughing and telling stories, with the owners hanging off every word he was saying quickly changed my feelings...after all it wasn't my day, it was Stuarts :-)


Time for me to wander off and have another look around the grounds of the museum as it had a few more trucks on display than it did last time I was there. The first thing to really stand out was the new Kenworth and DAF range of trucks.

Kenworth T908 powered by a 600hp Cummins ISX ERG with a rating of 140,000kg...

Kenworth T658 powered by a 625hp Cat C-15 Acert with a rating of 130,000kg...

Kenworth T608 powered by a 625hp Cat Acert with a rating of 90,000kg...

Kenworth K108 powered by a 625hp Cat C-15 Acert with a rating of 90,000kg...

The new DAF's were powered by Paccar MX 12.9 litre engines...

The air conditioned Kenworth pavilion was full of old classics on display...

They even had a timeline for §wishy to learn all about S-model Kenworths :wink:

Here's a "Shovel Nose" Kenworth that was imported and restored in the early 1980's by Royans Truck Repairs. The original owner was Skaggs Haulage, Sacremento California and has never been commercially used in Australia...

My personal favorite was this immaculate W-Model powered by a V12 Detroit. It has traveled 7 million kilometres during 24 years of work and has had 5 engines. Only 3 were ever built and this one looks like it did the first day it went to work...

Outside they had a small fleet of buses. A Leyland, Commer and Bedford...

And this awesome Diamond T 980 named "The Bitch" powered by a 6 cylinder Hercules diesel engine...

Eddy Holland from Darwin had his custom Mack R-750 Eddy-Liner...

I also got a better photo of one of the Army's MAN floats...


Seeing that I was back in Alice Springs, I needed to get a few more Road Train photos. I spotted this BULKtrans Tri-Drive T904 ready for his return trip to Darwin to reload aviation turbine fuel for the Alice Springs Airport. He told me it takes him 25 hours to get home and he loved every part of his job…

I had a phone call from a mate who was having his truck professionally photographed for a magazine and asked if I wanted to tag along. I couldn't say no to that!!! His truck was parked with the desert as a background and the photographer told us the "perfect" spot was picked out for the photo shoot and we had to go for a little drive. I didn't take a photo there, just in case my battery went flat and I missed out. We were taken to a concrete weighbridge with a crusty old scale house for the photo shoot. I couldn't believe it, all this beautiful scenery and we are sitting at a government weighbridge :?

We did finally move to a better location and I got the photo I was looking for...


As the sun went down, I was thinking that the whole few months of this journey have gone off without a hitch. His tanker is safely parked in the museum and Stuart is now an official legend of road transport. His photo is on the Wall of Fame amongst the toughest truck drivers this industry has ever seen; the likes of our very own kangaroo1, Ray Gilleland (The Nullarbor Kid)...

« Last Edit: August 31, 2007, 12:36:54 AM by DingosGotMyBaby »
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kenworth

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2007, 12:52:28 AM »
Sweet photos there mate and information :-)

terry

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2007, 01:08:26 AM »
Another top quality story with the pictures to go with it
Bear Grills calls it Man vs Wild
Aussies call it camping

§wishy

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2007, 02:24:54 AM »
Ding
GuddayM8

Great Pix
n
Great words

Keep m Cummin

U B now a wordsmith
LOL

Thanx 4 the great 'S' model KW pix
U R now inducted into the
-: KENWORTH - ‘S’ Model Truck Appreciation Society :-

cya

§wishy
HasBeen

GMS-AU

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #20 on: September 01, 2007, 02:34:19 AM »
Great pictures and words.  The effort you put in was noted.  You are lucky to have a boss who would let you do that.  Roo's can be a nuisance with out a bullbar, although I saw a KW much similar to yours but brown pulling a B-Double around Mt Isa-Cloncurry without a bullbar but I don't think he runs out there much, and was only travelling in the daylight.  Cattle and the occasional camel can also be a problem in that area.

I didn't know the Army had MAN's, funny the trucks even look like Brendan Neilsen.  They must have got them to haul the second hand rubbish the yanks sold us.  They don't even have bullbars.  I still see plenty of the S Lines running around pulling doubles and floats for the ARMY.  I even saw two pulling floats each with a Boral Kenworth agitator on board, so I presume there is some building going on in the Territory, but I thought some of there 6x6 Macks had agitators on them.

GMS

Daniel

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2007, 03:49:43 PM »
Outstanding stuff Dingo, very good reading and the Picures are amazing.  Keep it up mate.

Daniel.

werkhorse

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2007, 10:20:27 PM »
Hey Dingo  wicked stuff  there mate  8-) 8-) 8-)

I thought I'd do ya a cover for ya photo album...........Here tiz  :-P


kenworth

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2007, 11:54:17 PM »
Mate you really do know how to write a great story and you defintley know how to take some kickass photos :-D :-D

ThaddeusW

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2007, 07:10:26 PM »
Dingo,
Awesome story and pictures. Keep em coming!
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bad rce

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #25 on: November 01, 2007, 11:36:18 PM »
good work champ and you are right about stuart one of lifes gentleman and deserves to be in the hall of fame :wink:

terry

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2012, 11:13:12 PM »
Was looking through some photos i took at the transport hall of fame and remembered I took this one of Dingos trailer in its final resting place, with an appropriate prime mover in front, an International R 190

Bear Grills calls it Man vs Wild
Aussies call it camping

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Re: Outback Bound
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2012, 11:13:12 PM »